Disability claims services – Selagy Law http://selagylaw.com/ Tue, 17 May 2022 10:43:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://selagylaw.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-120x120.png Disability claims services – Selagy Law http://selagylaw.com/ 32 32 ageas SA/NV (OTCMKTS:AGESY) Stock Rating Update by Zacks Investment Research https://selagylaw.com/ageas-sa-nv-otcmktsagesy-stock-rating-update-by-zacks-investment-research/ Tue, 17 May 2022 10:43:13 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/ageas-sa-nv-otcmktsagesy-stock-rating-update-by-zacks-investment-research/ Zacks Investment Research enhanced actions of ageas SA/NV (OTCMKTS: AGESY – Get a rating) from a sell rating to a hold rating in a report released Monday morning, Zacks.com reports. According to Zacks, “Ageas, formerly known as Fortis, is an international insurance company. The Company has chosen to concentrate its commercial activities in Europe and […]]]>

Zacks Investment Research enhanced actions of ageas SA/NV (OTCMKTS: AGESYGet a rating) from a sell rating to a hold rating in a report released Monday morning, Zacks.com reports.

According to Zacks, “Ageas, formerly known as Fortis, is an international insurance company. The Company has chosen to concentrate its commercial activities in Europe and Asia. Ageas offers international insurance services such as life and non-life, disability and medical to individuals and groups. The Company also has subsidiaries in France, Germany, Turkey, Ukraine and Hong Kong. Ageas manages partnerships in Luxembourg, Italy, Portugal, China, Malaysia, India and Thailand. “

A number of other equity analysts also weighed in on AGESY. UBS Group lowered its price target on ageas SA/NV shares from €45.70 ($47.60) to €44.50 ($46.35) in a research report on Wednesday March 2. HSBC downgraded ageas SA/NV shares from a buy rating to a hold rating and set a target price of $52.50 for the company. in a research report on Monday, January 17. Credit Suisse Group raised its target price on ageas SA/NV shares from €38.50 ($40.10) to €42.70 ($44.48) and assigned the stock a rating of of underperformance in a Thursday, May 12, research report. Finally, Morgan Stanley raised its target price on ageas SA/NV shares from €58.00 ($60.42) to €59.00 ($61.46) and assigned the stock a rating of overweight in a Thursday, February 24, research report. Two equity research analysts rated the stock with a sell rating, four gave the stock a hold rating and four gave the stock a buy rating. According to MarketBeat, the company currently has an average rating of Hold and a consensus target price of $50.94.

AGESY opened at $46.54 on Monday. The company has a market capitalization of $8.89 billion, a P/E ratio of 9.03, a PEG ratio of 1.13 and a beta of 0.77. ageas SA/NV has a 1 year minimum of $42.05 and a 1 year maximum of $67.11. The company has a 50-day simple moving average of $49.26 and a two-hundred-day simple moving average of $50.16. The company has a debt ratio of 0.26, a current ratio of 0.05 and a quick ratio of 0.05.

ageas SA/NV (OTCMKTS: AGESYGet a rating) last released its quarterly results on Wednesday, February 23. The financial services provider reported earnings per share of $1.70 for the quarter, beating analyst consensus estimates of $1.57 by $0.13. The company had revenue of $4.38 billion in the quarter. ageas SA/NV achieved a net margin of 6.45% and a return on equity of 5.70%. Equity analysts expect ageas SA/NV to post earnings per share of 5.18 for the current year.

Company Profile ageas SA/NV (Get a rating)

ageas SA/NV, together with its subsidiaries, conducts insurance business in Europe and Asia. The company mainly offers property and casualty and life insurance products, as well as retirement products; and reinsurance products. Its life insurance products include risks relating to the life and death of people; and non-life insurance products include accident and health, auto, fire and other insurance products, as well as other property damage covering the risk of property loss or liability.

See also

Get a free copy of the Zacks research report on ageas SA/NV (AGESY)

For more information on Zacks Investment Research’s research offerings, visit Zacks.com

Analyst recommendations for ageas SA/NV (OTCMKTS: AGESY)



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Only support service for Blue Mountains Indigenous community threatened with closure after NSW government warns of eviction https://selagylaw.com/only-support-service-for-blue-mountains-indigenous-community-threatened-with-closure-after-nsw-government-warns-of-eviction/ Sun, 15 May 2022 19:24:28 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/only-support-service-for-blue-mountains-indigenous-community-threatened-with-closure-after-nsw-government-warns-of-eviction/ The only support service for indigenous people in the Blue Mountains faces an uncertain future after learning they were being evicted from their premises by the New South Wales government. The Indigenous Cultural and Resource Center has been operating for nearly 30 years in a cottage on the site of a former facility for children […]]]>

The only support service for indigenous people in the Blue Mountains faces an uncertain future after learning they were being evicted from their premises by the New South Wales government.

The Indigenous Cultural and Resource Center has been operating for nearly 30 years in a cottage on the site of a former facility for children of the Stolen Generations and mentally disabled in Katoomba.

The Indigenous Cultural and Resource Center is one of the organizations working on the site.(ABC News: Nakari Thorpe)

Now staff have been told the building failed to comply with accessibility and bushfire safety regulations and the NSW government is unwilling to pay the millions what it would cost for upgrades.

This means the service will have to find new premises and staff fear they will not be able to pay commercial rents, and the service, which provides vital support to the community, will have to close.

“The government has goals of ‘closing the gap’ it wants to achieve and the closure of Indigenous organizations is widening that gap,” said Indigenous and Cultural Resource Center Board Chair Bernadette O’Bryan. .

“I don’t understand how they can say one thing and do the opposite.”

Currently under an agreement with the state government, the community organization pays no rent.

two women sitting next to each other and smiling
Ms O’Bryan, left, says the closure of the ACRC runs counter to the Government’s targets to close the gap.(ABC News: Tony Ibrahim)
an old man showing a picture
Uncle Edward Walker says ACRC services saved his life.(ABC News: Tony Ibrahim)

Dharawal elder Uncle Edward Walker said the service provided vital support when he was diagnosed with cancer.

“[They] picked me up at my front door and took me to the hospital [to have radiotherapy] for eight weeks,” he said.

“If it wasn’t for them, I don’t know how we would have survived.”

Blue Mountains Mayor Mark Greenhill accused the government of exaggerating the problems so they could sell the land.

“This is a political decision to dislodge an important community building to earn a few dollars with no compassion or concern for the community organizations there,” he said.

“The thought that they might be left homeless by what I believe to be a heartless act is appalling to me.”

a man wearing glasses smiling
Mayor Mark Greenhill says the government has no compassion for community organizations.(Facebook: Mayor Mark Greenhill)
a mural on the exterior of a brick building
The native service is the only one of its kind in the Blue Mountains. (ABC News)

Cr Greenhill claimed the government had neglected the site for years and left it to decay.

“Now conveniently he wants to use his own negligence to kick important community service organizations off this site,” he said.

Local estate agents estimate the sale of the 2.4-acre site could bring the government up to $2 million.

The NSW Department of Communities and Justice (DCJ) said it was working closely with the community group to find alternative premises.

“DCJ remains committed to working collaboratively with the Blue Mountains Aboriginal Cultural Resource Center to assist them in their goal of providing services to their local community,” a spokesperson said.

The Blue Mountains Aboriginal Culture and Resource Center receives around $300,000 a year in funding from the NSW government.

an outdoor swing set in a yard
The Indigenous Cultural and Resource Center has operated from the Kedumba Chalet since 1996.(ABC News: Tony Ibrahim)
children's toys in a container
Gateway Family Services offers counseling for traumatized children and adults.(ABC News: Tony Ibrahim)

Three other community groups are also at risk of eviction, including Gateway Family Services, which provides counseling, support groups and emergency food services.

“I think it’s disappointing that they showed up and said, ‘You and your friends, this is too hard, stop what you’re doing and get out,'” general manager Gregory Lazarus said.

“The government expects us to vacate the premises and properties will invariably be sold.”

Mr Lazarus said it would be difficult to find an affordable alternative property in the Blue Mountains.

a man wearing glasses holding a cup and smiling
Mr. Lazarus says finding an alternative space will be difficult.(ABC News: Tony Ibrahim)

The DCJ’s real estate portfolio grew by $509 million over the past fiscal year, according to its 2021 annual report, to a value of $7.6 billion.

The disability nonprofit Leura Day Options, which receives about $900,000 a year in state government funding, and the Blue Mountains Wildplant Rescue Services are also being kicked out.

The state government says repairing the 50-year-old buildings and upgrading the site would cost $2.4 million.

“The property…has significant accessibility and bushfire safety non-compliance issues that cannot be addressed within the property’s existing zoning,” a spokesperson said.

a woman wearing glasses sitting at a table sorting seeds
The Wildplant Rescue Service also operates off site.(ABC News: Tony Ibrahim)
a group of green plants in a special indoor growing area
Plants that would otherwise be lost to development are rescued as part of the work done by the Wildplant Rescue Service.(ABC News: Tony Ibrahim)

The Mayor of Blue Mountains City Council, who is responsible for zoning, disputed this.

“It’s a pile of garbage,” said Cr Greenhill.

“If the state government had these concerns, where is the letter addressed to me?

“We will change the zoning if necessary.”

Uncle Kerry Mckenzie was 10 years old when placed in the former Clairvaux Children’s Home which occupied the site.

a sign outside
The Indigenous Cultural and Resource Center received $305,734 from the Department of Communities and Justice.(ABC News)

It took him almost 50 years to be ready to go back, as he struggled with post-traumatic stress disorder.

“They were ridiculously cruel. I couldn’t understand why they did what they did,” he said.

But in recent years, he has found refuge at the Indigenous Cultural and Resource Center.

“You can always go to the place and have a cup of tea and sit down and do some yarn.”

a woman watering plants
The sale of the Clairvaux community center could bring the government nearly $2 million.(ABC News: Tony Ibrahim)
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Beneva selects Mitchell to streamline claims management https://selagylaw.com/beneva-selects-mitchell-to-streamline-claims-management/ Tue, 10 May 2022 13:03:00 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/beneva-selects-mitchell-to-streamline-claims-management/ Canadian Insurer Will Leverage Company’s Cutting-Edge Technology to Simplify Auto Claims Processing and Accelerate Settlement SAN DIEGO, May 10, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Mitchell, an Enlyte company and leading provider of technology and information for the Damage & Accident (P&C) claims and Collision Repair industries, today announced that Beneva, the largest mutual insurance company Canada, has […]]]>

Canadian Insurer Will Leverage Company’s Cutting-Edge Technology to Simplify Auto Claims Processing and Accelerate Settlement

SAN DIEGO, May 10, 2022 /PRNewswire/ Mitchell, an Enlyte company and leading provider of technology and information for the Damage & Accident (P&C) claims and Collision Repair industries, today announced that Beneva, the largest mutual insurance company Canada, has selected its suite of enterprise claims management solutions. These solutions are designed to improve the efficiency and accuracy of claims processing, helping Beneva meet the needs of its more than 3.5 million members and customers.

Beneva conducted a thorough review of its technology platforms before choosing Mitchell as a provider of automotive claims, appraisal and total loss technology.

“Our customers are at the heart of everything we do,” said Jonathan Pilon, Director of Claims, Commercial Partnerships and Expertise at Beneva. “Using Mitchell’s innovative solutions, we can meet their expectations for a fast and easy digital claims experience. We are also well positioned to improve this experience in the future by leveraging artificial intelligence and other breakthrough technologies to automate key steps in the claims process.”

From Mitchell the solutions selected by Beneva are Mitchell WorkCenter and Mitchell cloud estimate. Mitchell WorkCenter will help the carrier effectively manage audit and assessment review, repair status, reporting and total loss. With Mitchell Cloud Estimating and its Built-in repair procedures, Beneva and its affiliated collision repair centers can write estimates from any internet-connected smartphone, tablet or laptop. Its scalable, cloud-based architecture enabled the insurer to deploy the technology to more than 600 appraisers and body shops in just one week.

“We are delighted to support one of from Canada the best insurers and the main providers of Quebec,” mentioned debbie dayExecutive Vice President and General Manager of Mitchell’s Automatic Physical Damage Division. “Since the 2020 Canadian launch of Mitchell Cloud Estimating, we have continued to expand our North American presence by helping carriers and collision repairers on both sides of the border streamline workflows, improve productivity and digitize the claims process.

About Mitchell International
Based at San Diego, California., Mitchell International, Inc. provides intelligent technology solutions and services to the auto insurance, collision repair, disability, and workers’ compensation markets. With deep industry expertise, connections across the insurance ecosystem, and cutting-edge technologies like artificial intelligence and cloud-based solutions, Mitchell enables its clients and customers to succeed in today’s ever-changing environment. Each month, Mitchell processes tens of millions of transactions for more than 300 insurers, 20,000 collision repair shops and 70,000 pharmacies. Its comprehensive portfolio of solutions and services enables clients to restore lives after a difficult event.

MitchellGenex and Coventry recently aligned their joint industry expertise and cutting-edge technology solutions to form Enlyte, a parent brand with more than 6,000 associates committed to simplifying and optimizing P&C and disability claims processes and services.

For more information, please visit www.mitchell.com or follow Mitchell on Twitter @MitchellClaims and @MitchellRepair for property damage and collision repair updates.

About Beneva
Beneva is the largest mutual insurance Canada with over 3.5 million members and customers. Beneva employs more than 5,000 dedicated employees: people who watch over people. Its human approach is rooted in mutualist values ​​shared by its employees. With $25 billion of assets, Beneva is positioned as a major player in the insurance and financial services industry. Its head office is located at Quebec City.

For more information, please visit www.beneva.ca.

SOURCEMitchell International

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IndiGo arrested for preventing disabled child from boarding, airline provides clarification https://selagylaw.com/indigo-arrested-for-preventing-disabled-child-from-boarding-airline-provides-clarification/ Sun, 08 May 2022 19:05:28 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/indigo-arrested-for-preventing-disabled-child-from-boarding-airline-provides-clarification/ Indigo arrested for preventing disabled child from boarding (Facebook/Manisha Gupta) Ranchi: The Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGAC) initiated an investigation and requested a report from Indigo to prevent a disabled child from boarding a flight Ranchi Airport on Saturday when he was in “a state of panic”. The incident created an uproar on social […]]]>

Indigo arrested for preventing disabled child from boarding (Facebook/Manisha Gupta)

Ranchi: The Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGAC) initiated an investigation and requested a report from Indigo to prevent a disabled child from boarding a flight Ranchi Airport on Saturday when he was in “a state of panic”.

The incident created an uproar on social media that forced the airline to issue a statement explaining why its staff made the decision.

Manisha Gupta, a passenger on the affected Ranchi-Hyderabad flight who was present at the time of the incident, wrote in her Facebook post that the specially disabled person “had a very uncomfortable drive to the airport”. By the time he passed through security and reached the gate (almost an hour before boarding), he appeared to be in the throes of hunger, thirst, anxiety and confusion.

However, he was soothed after his parents gave him food, juice, water and love, Gupta said.

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The whole incident was observed by an IndiGo staff member, who warned the family that the child would not be allowed to board the flight unless he was acting “normal”. Staff told the family that the child posed a risk to other passengers on the flight, Gupta alleged.

Although other passengers, including doctors and government officials present at the scene, intervened and argued with airline staff to allow the child to board the flight with his parents, the IndiGo official remained adamant about his decision.

As the boy was banned from boarding the airline’s Ranchi-Hyderabad flight, his parents also decided not to take the flight.

DGCA chief Arun Kumar told PTI that the regulator has requested a report from IndiGo on the matter. “The Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGAC) is investigating this incident and will take appropriate action,” Kumar said.

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On the other hand, when the issue sparked criticism on the internet, IndiGo issued a statement claiming that the specially disabled child could not have boarded the flight because he was in a state of panic”.

“Considering the safety of passengers, a disabled child could not board with his family on May 7, because he was in a state of panic. Ground staff waited for him to calm down until the last minute but to no avail,” the airline said.

“The airline put the family at ease by offering them a hotel stay and they flew the next morning to their destination,” he said.

Related News

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“We regret the inconvenience caused to passengers. IndiGo prides itself on being an inclusive organization, both for its employees and its customers; and more than 75,000 passengers with special disabilities fly with IndiGo each month,” the airline added in the press release.

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VA Claims Insider Contributes $25,000 to Help Troops Build Physical and Spiritual Fitness Through Outdoor Adventure https://selagylaw.com/va-claims-insider-contributes-25000-to-help-troops-build-physical-and-spiritual-fitness-through-outdoor-adventure/ Wed, 04 May 2022 21:29:00 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/va-claims-insider-contributes-25000-to-help-troops-build-physical-and-spiritual-fitness-through-outdoor-adventure/ SIMV CEO Brian Reese and Soul Survivor Outdoor Founder Rick Wolf Announce Collaborative Programs Connecting the Military to Nature and Each Other AUSTIN, TEXAS, USA, May 4, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — VA Claims Insider is donating $25,000 to Soul Survivor Outdoor to help active duty troops build physical and spiritual fitness through outdoor adventure VA Claims […]]]>

SIMV CEO Brian Reese and Soul Survivor Outdoor Founder Rick Wolf Announce Collaborative Programs Connecting the Military to Nature and Each Other

AUSTIN, TEXAS, USA, May 4, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — VA Claims Insider is donating $25,000 to Soul Survivor Outdoor to help active duty troops build physical and spiritual fitness through outdoor adventure

VA Claims Insider (VACI) CEO Brian Reese and Soul Survivor Outdoor Founder Rick Wolf today announced a collaboration on programs to connect service members with nature and each other.

VA Claims Insider continued its support of Soul Survivor Outdoor, a faith-based outdoor adventure business that exclusively serves the active duty military community, with a $25,000 donation.

SSO addresses spiritual fitness and resilience through outdoor adventures with active duty service members across the country.

Resonating deeply with SSO’s vision, Brian Reese, CEO of VA Claims Insider, became a donor and supporter in 2021. Both companies share a mission to support and empower those who serve our country.

Reese was introduced to SSO founder Rick Wolf through a veteran SIMV trainer who is also a member of the Soul Survivor team.

Wolf served nearly 30 years in the Marine Corps, including serving as the OCI of the Wounded Warrior Detachment in Twentynine Palms, California. This fueled his passion for helping those currently on active duty to be as physically, mentally and spiritually fit as possible.

He launched SSO in 2014 with this vision, partnering with military leaders to build more resilient military personnel.

Wolf notes, “We are thrilled that SIMV continues to be a strong supporter of our mission to serve active duty military members through outdoor adventure. The only way we operate is through donations from individuals and corporations such as SIMV. It is really through their generosity that we can have an impact on the lives of soldiers.

Wolf explained that this latest contribution “helped us get to the Fort Camel, Kentucky area and Coast Guard bases on the east coast. This funding has allowed us to expand into three more states this year than planned. »

The expansion allowed about 400 more service members to participate in SSO programs. SSO offers all of its spiritual and outdoor fitness programs free of charge to military service members.

The mental health of veterans is a passion for the two founders. By supporting SSO, “our goal is to reach them before they are in crisis”.

“We know from secular and faith-based studies that when people get out into nature it reduces stress and connects them on a soul level as well as a team level. It opens them up to the big world and helps them see that they were put here for a reason,” Wolf said.

Studies show that outdoor recreational activity experiences improve the psychological well-being of service members with PTSD. For example, the Sierra Club and researchers at the University of Utah published a study linking exposure to nature and improving military mental health. These findings align with similar research conducted with non-military populations.

“Mental health issues are epidemic among active duty military and veterans alike,” said Reese, a disabled Air Force veteran who deployed to Afghanistan as part of the operation. Enduring Freedom. “The pandemic has only exacerbated mental health issues and the need for innovative programs that heal our service members.”

Reese adds, “When we saw the action and passion behind Soul Survivors’ mission, we knew it was a great fit for collaboration and complementary to our own mission. We wanted to help them continue their good work.

================================================= ============================================

About Soul Survivor Outdoor
Soul Survivor Outdoor is a non-profit, faith-based center offering outdoor adventures to active duty military. More information about Soul Survivor Outdoor is available here.

About VA Claims Insider
VA Claims Insider is an education-based coaching/consulting company for veterans with disabilities who are investigating eligibility for increased VA disability benefits. SIMV’s mission is “veterans help veterans access education-based resources to achieve the VA disability rating and compensation they deserve.” The company has helped over 15,000 veterans win cases and increase their ratings.

(VA Claims Insider, LLC is not an accredited agent, VSO, attorney or entity recognized by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and is in no way affiliated with the VA. VA Claims Insider, LLC n does not assist veterans with the preparation, submission, and prosecution of VA disability claims for VA benefits. Veterans prepare and file their own claim or work with an Accredited Representative, many of whom offer free services.)

media@vaclaimsinsider.com

Trinidad-Aguirre
VA Claims Insider
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Young: Compromise for medical malpractice | Workers Compensation News https://selagylaw.com/young-compromise-for-medical-malpractice-workers-compensation-news/ Tue, 03 May 2022 07:00:59 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/young-compromise-for-medical-malpractice-workers-compensation-news/ By Julius Young Tuesday, May 3, 2022 | 0 It looks like the California legislature will likely approve a negotiated compromise that would revise medical malpractice claim limits. Julius Young The law project, BA 35would amend the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act of 1975, which places severe caps on recoveries for non-economic damages in medical […]]]>

By Julius Young

Tuesday, May 3, 2022 | 0

It looks like the California legislature will likely approve a negotiated compromise that would revise medical malpractice claim limits.

Julius Young

The law project, BA 35would amend the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act of 1975, which places severe caps on recoveries for non-economic damages in medical malpractice actions.

As part of the negotiated compromise, supporters of MICRA reform would withdraw a reform initiative known as the Injured Patient Fairness Act from the November 2022 ballot, provided AB 35 is passed and signed by Governor Gavin Newsom before the June 28 deadline to withdraw an initiative from the November ballot.

MICRA’s reform efforts have resulted in costly political battles that have failed over the years. This is therefore a welcome development that will bring some relief to those injured by medical malpractice. Under AB 35, instead of the current cap of $250,000 on non-economic damages in cases other than death, the limit would increase in increments to $750,000 over a 10-year period. In the event of death, it would increase from $500,000 to $1 million. After 10 years, there would be an annual adjustment of 2%.

Additionally, AB 35 would allow separate limits for health care facilities (defined differently from health care providers) and also for unaffiliated health care facilities.

No known objections have been filed with the California Senate Judiciary Committee to date.

It should be noted that under current law, Civil Code 3333.1 provides that:

(a) If the defendant so decides, in an action for personal injury against the health care provider based on professional negligence, he may present evidence of any amount payable as a benefit to the plaintiff as a result of the personal injury in accordance with to United States social security law, any state or federal disability or workers’ compensation law, any health, sickness, or disability insurance, accident insurance that provides health benefits, or disability coverage, and any contract or agreement of any group, organization, partnership or company to provide, pay or reimburse the cost of medical, hospital, dental or other health care services. Where the defendant chooses to produce such proof, the plaintiff may produce proof of any amount he has paid or contributed to secure his right to any insurance benefit for which the defendant has produced proof.

(b) No source of collateral benefits introduced under sub-section (a) shall recover any amount against the plaintiff or be subrogated in the rights of the plaintiff against a defendant.

However, the proposed ballot initiative, the Fairness for Injured Patients Act, included a provision that would repeal civil code 3333.1. Repeal of this would have allowed employers and workers’ compensation carriers to have subrogation rights in medical malpractice claims in California, which they currently do not have under Civil Code 3333.1 (b ).

But the repeal of Civil Code 3333.1(a) apparently would have removed the ability of a medical malpractice defendant to present evidence of workers’ benefits paid to a malpractice plaintiff. Thus, the Injured Patient Fairness Act would have had implications for California’s injured workers and employers.

The compromise negotiated in AB 35 avoids the changes proposed under the initiative.

Julius Young is a nominee attorney and partner at the law firm Boxer & Gerson in Oakland. This column was reprinted with his permission from his Workers Comp Zone blog on the company’s website. website.

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Digital payments a complex operation https://selagylaw.com/digital-payments-a-complex-operation/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/digital-payments-a-complex-operation/ Mark Raymer, Executive Merchant Services at NAB. NAB Although healthcare is a market, it is “an imperfect market,” says Andrew Irvine, NAB Group Director for Corporates and Private Banking. “There’s the patient, there’s the practitioner or the service provider, and there’s the actual funder or payer, and it has to work for all of them. […]]]>

Mark Raymer, Executive Merchant Services at NAB. NAB

Although healthcare is a market, it is “an imperfect market,” says Andrew Irvine, NAB Group Director for Corporates and Private Banking. “There’s the patient, there’s the practitioner or the service provider, and there’s the actual funder or payer, and it has to work for all of them. Unfortunately, many aspects of health service delivery are still very manual and paper-intensive.

“If you’re a health care provider, you might see someone who’s paid by Medicare, you might see someone who’s paid by private health, you might see someone who’s paid by indemnity workers’ compensation, you might see someone who is paid by the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), you might see someone who pays out of pocket, and all of the above,” says Irvine.

“And each of those things comes with its own idiosyncratic complexities. Add to that pharmacy claims, which is still a very manual process today, and you have a very high friction experience. »

NAB is already a major player in healthcare payments, through its wholly-owned subsidiary HICAPS (the healthcare industry claims and payments service), which is the leading provider of payment terminals for industry, used by all Australian private health funds and more. more than 94,000 health service providers.

Recently, the bank purchased digital health claims startup LanternPay, which was designed to standardize the claims and payments experience for all public and private health plan service providers, including insurers. private health, state employees and accident insurance, Medicare and the NDIS. .

Irvine says the combination of HICAPS and LanternPay will bring together the best of HICAP and LanternPay, to create a smoother digital payment experience and further accelerate the digital transformation of the industry.

Andrew Irvine, NAB Group Director for Corporates and Private Banking. NAB

“In every other area of ​​our lives, digital and mobile have really come of age,” says Irvine.

“People can book a plane ticket on their smartphone, they can buy inventory, they can buy a fridge. They expect and demand that capability, and healthcare is no exception,” he says.

“LanternPay enables mobile claiming for Medicare, some private health insurance and workers’ compensation, and NDIS, but what it hasn’t enabled are discrepancy payments; while HICAPS has this capability through its terminal. One of our priorities with LanternPay is to create a smartphone HICAPS application allowing claims to be made via mobile phones for firms that do not have physical terminals.

Combining the best of HICAP and LanternPay, Irvine says NAB has a digital experience with more modalities.

“In one go, you can both make the claim and pay the difference payment to the supplier. But what we’re really working on is that we see the potential of having an app that not only eliminates friction, but does the transactions for you – payment, claim and refund – and does it instantly.

With the app as a “single source of knowledge,” all sides of the healthcare market benefit, Irvine says, because all relevant data is instantly accessible.

“The consumer, the patient, often just doesn’t know what they’re entitled to – they can pay for drugs, and even though they know they’re supposed to be reimbursed, it may never happen. to claim. We end up with people not using the coverage they paid for or earned, because it’s just too hard.

“It would be great to have something smart, that gives you a clear idea of ​​your insurance eligibility and what proportion of a purchase you’re covered for, so you don’t have to do all these calculations,” says Irvine.

“Your app tells you, ‘OK, I used a service, 70% is paid for by my insurance, 30% is out of pocket, and here’s what my balance looks like after that.’ If people know how much coverage they have left, you start being able to advise the consumer by saying, “You have enough coverage to do this once a month. Do you want to book next month’s appointment? It may not be, but you are starting to bring in the data needed to really improve the experience and provide guidance to the patient.”

And the real beauty of that is that it works for both the practitioner and the payer, says Irvine.

In an app-driven world of health, the “efficiency dividend” of streamlining a $120 billion spend is “potentially enormous,” says Irvine.

“We expect a significant reduction in practitioner time and effort, and a significant reduction in unnecessary expense. If all expenses are tracked and optimized, it paves the way for something this industry has never really considered: the time value of money.

Special report: restoring health

Read the full report:

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Health Allied: Dentists stop to help during crisis

Health Innovation: New Health Care Models Driven by COVID Drive Better Patient Outcomes

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Healthy seniors: The senior care industry supports many different models

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Nurse Convicted in Criminal Proceedings for Medication Error Has Healthcare Professionals Concerned – Professional Negligence https://selagylaw.com/nurse-convicted-in-criminal-proceedings-for-medication-error-has-healthcare-professionals-concerned-professional-negligence/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 09:05:48 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/nurse-convicted-in-criminal-proceedings-for-medication-error-has-healthcare-professionals-concerned-professional-negligence/ Wood, Smith, Henning & Berman LLP April 26, 2022 Wood, Smith, Henning & Berman LLP To print this article, all you need to do is be registered or log in to Mondaq.com. In a chilling decision for medical professionals, a Tennessee jury recently convicted a Vanderbilt University Medical Center nurse of […]]]>



To print this article, all you need to do is be registered or log in to Mondaq.com.

In a chilling decision for medical professionals, a Tennessee jury recently convicted a Vanderbilt University Medical Center nurse of reckless homicide and gross negligence of an intoxicated adult patient. Criminal charges were filed against the nurse after she accidentally administered the wrong medication to a patient who later died. This case has broad implications for health care law and medical professionals across the country.

Background Facts

In October 2015, RaDonda Vaught, a registered nurse, began working at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. On Christmas Eve 2017, Charlene Murphey, then 75, was admitted to Vanderbilt with a brain hemorrhage. Over the next two days, Murphy’s condition improved to the point where she was almost ready to be discharged. As part of the exit plan, Murphey was to undergo a final PET scan.

When Vaught was unable to locate the drug Versed (a sedative) in an automatic drug dispensing cabinet, she used a system override and accidentally fired and administered the drug Vecuronium, a paralyzing drug. Besides pulling the wrong drug, Vaught didn’t read the name of the drug, didn’t notice a red warning on the top of the Vecuronium package, didn’t recognize that Versed is a drug liquid whereas Vecuronium is in powder form; and failed to stay with Murphey to check for any adverse reactions to drug administration. After administration of the Vecuronium, Murphey died.

After the patient’s death, Vaught allegedly admitted to other staff that she had made a mistake administering Murphey’s medication. Two Vanderbilt neurologists reported the death to the county medical examiner, but omitted any mention of the medication error. Neurologists attributed Murphey’s death to brain hemorrhage instead of receiving Vecuronium. The medical examiner found no reason to investigate Murphey’s death at the time, based on information provided to the medical examiner’s office.

Nurse Vaught was later charged and convicted of reckless homicide and abuse of an intoxicated adult.

At trial, Vaught argued that Vanderbilt was at least partially responsible for the medication error. She pointed out that Vanderbilt had not disclosed the truth about Murphey’s death to the appropriate government or public agencies. Vaught presented several pieces of evidence in support of this argument:

  • Vanderbilt incorrectly reported the death by failing to mention medication error as a possible cause;

  • Vanderbilt fired Vaught after the incident and quietly brokered an out-of-court settlement with Murphey’s family. As part of this settlement, the family signed a nondisclosure agreement that prohibited them from discussing the incident in public;

  • Details of Murphey’s death only came to light after an anonymous informant contacted the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Tennessee Department of Health. Following the tip, the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation opened a criminal investigation into the matter. A special agent testified during the trial that, “In this case, the review led the Department of Health to believe that Vanderbilt Medical Center bore a heavy burden in this matter. No discipline was imposed because, according to the lawyer for the Ministry of Health, professional misconduct must be gross negligence before they can sanction for it.” In fact, the Tennessee Department of Health did not sanction Vanderbilt Medical Center, but it did revoke Vaught’s nursing license. Vaught acknowledged and admitted his error, but claimed that the error was only made possible by continuing technical problems and faulty procedures at Vanderbilt.

A nurse educator on the Vanderbilt unit where Vaught worked testified that it was ‘common’ for nurses to ‘override’ the automatic medication dispensing cabinet to make it more efficient in procuring medication from of the cabinet.

Medical negligence is now a crime?

Vaught was charged and convicted of both reckless homicide and abuse of an intoxicated adult. The criminal charges have had a chilling effect throughout the medical community which is already facing morale issues and staffing shortages due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Although negligence and even gross negligence claims against healthcare professionals are common, it is rare for a healthcare professional to face criminal charges as a result of their actions or omissions. In response to the verdict, the American Nurses Association and the Tennessee Nurses Association released a joint statement noting in part: “Health care delivery is very complex. It is inevitable that errors will occur and systems will fail. It is totally unrealistic to think the criminalization of medical errors is unnerving, and this verdict sets a dangerous precedent. There are more efficient and fairer mechanisms for reviewing errors, establishing system improvements and taking corrective action.

Sentencing of Nurse Vaught is scheduled to take place on May 13, 2023.

Key points to remember:

  • While this case is of great concern to medical professionals, the number of safeguards Nurse Vaught circumvented is a significant factor in the outcome of this case. It was not a situation with one error but with several errors;

  • Hospitals should take note of this decision given that there was evidence they were aware that nurses were bypassing the electronic medicine cabinet. If hospitals are aware of this pattern of conduct among their nursing staff, hospitals should educate their nursing staff to ensure that they follow proper protocols for drug supply;

  • Electronic medication delivery safeguards alone are not enough to always protect patients from human error;

  • The disclosure of the error was not entirely open and transparent. The administration of the wrong drug was not disclosed by the medical examiner. In any civil litigation that would arise from this type of event, these factors are extremely poor optics that could lead to the imposition of punitive damages. Transparency about what happened after the error was disclosed is essential for the Hospital to maintain credibility in its statements about taking patient safety seriously.

  • Many in the health field have expressed the view that improving systems and corrective action should be encouraged rather than hanging the fear of criminalization and condemnation over nurses’ heads. This precedent may discourage nurses and other staff from reporting misconduct, errors or “near misses”. Over time, this can lead to more deaths by accident and negligence;

  • While according to the American Nurses’ Association, medical errors are “inevitable”,
    the same are rarely, if ever, prosecuted in criminal court unless an element of intentional behavior is present;

  • After the COVID-19 pandemic, most hospitals are struggling with a nursing shortage. The ramifications of this belief may have a further chilling effect on the industry and the willingness of potential nurses to enter the profession; and

  • Vaught’s conviction not only set a very concerning precedent for the nursing community, but it also demonstrates that the goodwill medical professionals had extended to them during the COVID-19 pandemic when doctors, nurses and others members of staff have been honored as “heroes” because their commitment to providing public health care in difficult circumstances has already begun to fade. This erosion of the “heroic” nature of these health professionals will also have an impact on civil verdicts and damages.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

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People who miss DWP payments which could be worth up to £627 every four weeks https://selagylaw.com/people-who-miss-dwp-payments-which-could-be-worth-up-to-627-every-four-weeks/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 09:28:00 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/people-who-miss-dwp-payments-which-could-be-worth-up-to-627-every-four-weeks/ Millions of people receive support from the Department for Work and Pensions, but there are still thousands of people who do not claim the exact amount of benefits because they do not know what they are fully entitled to. On 31 January 2022, 2.9million people across the UK were applying for help through Personal Independence […]]]>

Millions of people receive support from the Department for Work and Pensions, but there are still thousands of people who do not claim the exact amount of benefits because they do not know what they are fully entitled to.

On 31 January 2022, 2.9million people across the UK were applying for help through Personal Independence Payments (PIPs), with just over one in three applicants (35%) receiving the highest level reward, the latest figures from the Department of Labor and Pensions Show (DWP).

People claiming psychiatric disorders, which include autism spectrum disorders, mood disorders and learning disabilities, are also on the rise, Live reports from Lancashire. In January, the number of UK-wide claimants for these types of conditions rose by 33,160 to 1,045,503. Musculoskeletal conditions, such as arthritis, joint pain and hip, increased from 23,465 to 932,577 over the four-month period.

READ MORE: M5 closed due to ducks on the road – updates

Between October 2021 and January 2022, the DWP also confirmedThere was:

  • 170,000 registrations for new claims
  • 23,000 reported changes in circumstances
  • 19,000 registrations for Disability Living Allowance (DLA) reassessments
  • 130,000 registrations expected for the evaluation of the awards
  • 75,000 manual review records

For people with a long-term illness, mental health issue, or physical or learning disability, the PIP is designed to help, however, many people are reluctant to claim this essential benefit, assuming mistakenly that they are not eligible.

Now the Adult Disability Payment is set to replace the PIP in Scotland, which will follow the same eligibility criteria but take a more people-centred approach. The first deployment begins on March 21.

Assessment assignment rates vary by disabling condition, and a PIP applicant’s primary disabling condition is recorded at their assessment in more than 99% of cases, reports the DWP.

Total number of categories:

  • Disability category – 21 (including unknown or missing)
  • Persons with disabilities sub-group – 178
  • Disability – 547

Of claims that have been assessed under normal rules, 81% of new claims and 88% of DLA reassessment claims are recorded as having one of the five most common disabling conditions.

These are:

  • Psychiatric disorders – 1,045,503 claimants
  • Musculoskeletal disease (general) – 587,148 claimants
  • Musculoskeletal disease (regional) – 345,429 claimants
  • Neurological disease – 376,249 claimants
  • Respiratory disease – 128,316 claimants

Disabling conditions and UK claimant numbers – January 2022

These are the main categories of disability, the umbrella term under which a total of 547 other conditions fall.

This list is just an overview of the conditions, disorders, and illnesses and how the DWP lists the major disabilities for which a claim is made.

  • Blood disease – 6,522
  • Infectious disease – 6,649
  • Malignant disease – 86,119
  • Metabolic disease – 4,330
  • Psychiatric Disorders – 1,045,503
  • Neurological disease – 376,249
  • Visual disease – 53,684
  • Hearing disorders – 30,801
  • Cardiovascular disease – 72,911
  • Gastrointestinal disease – 24,343
  • Diseases of the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts – 10,001
  • Skin disease – 19,049
  • Musculoskeletal disease (general) – 587,148
  • Musculoskeletal disease (regional) – 345,429
  • Autoimmune disease (connective tissue disorders) – 16,230
  • Genitourinary disease – 21,073
  • Endocrine disease – 39,692
  • Respiratory disease – 128,316
  • Multisystem and age extremes – 1,024
  • Immune System Diseases – 907

What is PIP?

The PIP is a benefit which is gradually replacing the Disability Living Allowance (DLA).

If you need extra help because of an illness, disability, or mental health issue, you may be eligible for PEP.

You will be assessed by a medical professional to determine the level of help you can get and your rate will be reviewed to ensure you are getting the right support.

Who is eligible for the PIP?

Anyone with a health condition or disability when you:

You usually need to have lived in the UK for at least two of the past three years and be in the country when you apply.

In addition to what we’ve described above, if you get or need help with any of the following because of your condition, you should consider applying for PIP – or Adult Disabled Payment , depending on where you live.

  • prepare, cook or eat food
  • managing your medications
  • wash, bathe or go to the toilet
  • dressing and undressing
  • engage and communicate with other people
  • read and understand written information
  • make decisions about money
  • plan a trip or follow an itinerary
  • move outside the house

There are different rules if you are terminally ill, you can find them on the GOV.UK website here.

The DWP will assess how difficult you find the tasks of daily living and mobility. For each task, they will examine:

  • if you can do it safely
  • how long does it take you
  • how often your condition affects this activity
  • if you need help to do so, from a person or by using additional equipment

How is the PIP paid?

The PIP is usually paid every four weeks, unless you are terminally ill, in which case it is paid weekly.

The PIP will be paid directly into your bank, building society or credit union account.

The disabled adult payment will be paid at the same rates as the PIP.

What are the PIP payout rates?

You will need an assessment to determine the level of financial assistance you will receive and your rate will be reviewed regularly to ensure you are getting the right support.

Payment rates increased by 3.1% on April 11.

The PIP is made up of two components:

Whether you get one or both and how much depends on the severity of your condition affecting you.

You will be paid the following amounts per week depending on your situation:

Daily life

  • Standard rate: £61.85

  • Premium rate: £92.40

Mobility

  • Standard rate: £24.45

  • Premium rate: £64.50

How you are rated

You will be assessed by an independent medical professional to help the DWP determine what level of financial support you need, if any.

Face-to-face consultations for health-related benefits are offered alongside video calls, telephone and paper-based assessments – it is important to be aware that there is no choice here, it is at healthcare professional and the DWP to decide.

Assessments for Adult Disability Payments will not involve in-person assessments unless preferred by the applicant.

How to apply for PIP?

You can make a new request by contacting the DWP, you will find all the information you need to make your request on the GOV.UK website here.

Before calling, you will need:

  • your contact details

  • your date of birth

  • your national insurance number – this is on letters regarding taxes, pensions and benefits

  • your bank or building society account number and sort code

  • the name, address and telephone number of your doctor or health care professional

  • dates and addresses of any stay abroad, in a retirement home or hospital

Once you have contacted the DWP, they will send you a document to fill out consisting of 14 questions. This includes space for any additional information you feel is relevant to your request.

You can add as much detail to help the assessor understand your physical or mental health needs as the questions focus on how your condition affects you.

Contact your local council and ask for help or Citizens Advice Scotland if you have difficulty completing your form or understanding the questions,

Even if you are not eligible for financial aid, you may be eligible for a National Travel Card, which offers free or reduced travel across Scotland on most public transport routes.

For more information on the PIP, visit GOV.UK here.

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Two Owen Sound veterans receive national awards https://selagylaw.com/two-owen-sound-veterans-receive-national-awards/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 09:20:51 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/two-owen-sound-veterans-receive-national-awards/ Two veterans from Owen Sound received Canada’s Minister of Veterans Affairs Commendation. Warrant Officer (Retired) Robert Barrie Jack and Corporal (Retired) Donald Young were recognized in a virtual ceremony on March 28. Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defense Lawrence MacAulay presented the awards in recognition of their work to improve the […]]]>

Two veterans from Owen Sound received Canada’s Minister of Veterans Affairs Commendation.

Warrant Officer (Retired) Robert Barrie Jack and Corporal (Retired) Donald Young were recognized in a virtual ceremony on March 28.

Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defense Lawrence MacAulay presented the awards in recognition of their work to improve the care and well-being of Canada’s Veterans. The ceremony was also attended by Conservative MP for Bruce-Grey-Owen Sound, Alex Ruff.

MacAulay said in a statement that the Veterans Affairs Minister’s Commendation is the highest honor he can bestow, adding, “I am extremely grateful for the wide range of volunteer work they have undertaken. The quiet community work done by people who don’t expect recognition for what they do is what really makes the difference. And for me, it’s even more important when it comes to helping and honoring the people who have served our country.

Robert Barrie Jack of Owen Sound was recognized for his service with the Royal Canadian Legion. The Federal Government says Jack is the Veterans Services Officer for the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 6 in Owen Sound. His nomination page reads, “In this role, he works diligently to ensure the well-being of Veterans. This ranges from assisting with disability claims, helping homeless veterans with temporary housing, food and emergency debt relief, to hosting veterans dinners and visits to retirement homes.

The appointment continues: “He is an integral part of the organization of the annual Remembrance Day ceremony and is always available to help families organize funerals and memorial services. Much of his volunteering as a service officer with the Royal Canadian Legion is a lifeline for area veterans. He always devotes time and effort, on and off duty, to caring for and remembering veterans.

Jack’s nomination page indicates that in addition to his work as a duty officer, he helped raise thousands of dollars in emergency donations to help veterans.

Corporal (Retired) Donald Edward Young, who is also an Owen Sound resident, was nominated for his work with the Canadian Veterans Freedom Riders (CFVR).

Young joined the Canadian Veteran Freedom Riders in 2014 where he served as Treasurer of the Bruce-Grey-Owen Sound Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol (CVFR LLRP).

His nomination page reads, “He is an integral part of the unit, contributing thousands of hours to the welfare of local veterans in this community. It helps homeless veterans with temporary housing, food, and emergency debt relief, while soliciting donations from local community businesses. As of July 2020, his efforts have led to four major gifts totaling over $12,500 to aid Freedom Riders’ mandate to provide emergency aid to local veterans in need.

He continues, “Cpl Young is a true team player who continues to participate in the CVFR food drive by helping the local food bank and veterans.

Young assists the Owen Sound Legion with the Poppy Campaign and represents the Freedom Riders each year at local Remembrance Day ceremonies.

His appointment reads, “Much of the volunteer work he has done as Treasurer and Member is a lifeline for local veterans as he continues to dedicate exceptional time and effort to ensure the veteran community is supported and honored.”

Recognized veterans this year:

Sergeant (Retired) Christopher Banks, Brampton, ON
Sergeant Katherine Ferris, Aylmer, Ont.
Warrant Officer (Retired) Robert Barrie Jack, Owen Sound, ON
Lieutenant (Navy) Jean-Marc Leblond, Bonfield, Ont.
Rene Laquerre, Toronto, Ont.
Neala A. Taylor, New Hamburg, Ont.
Major Andrea Villeneuve, Timmins, Ont.
Sergeant Coogan J. Wilson, Mississauga, Ont.
Corporal (Retired) Donald Young, Owen Sound, ON

The commendation consists of a certificate, a lapel pin for civilian clothes, and a bar to wear with decorations.

The design is a golden maple leaf resting on a red poppy, with the royal crown on top of the pin.

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