health care – Selagy Law http://selagylaw.com/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 09:02:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://selagylaw.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-120x120.png health care – Selagy Law http://selagylaw.com/ 32 32 Congressional votes for the week of February 25 to March 3 | Local News https://selagylaw.com/congressional-votes-for-the-week-of-february-25-to-march-3-local-news/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 23:30:00 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/congressional-votes-for-the-week-of-february-25-to-march-3-local-news/ Here’s a look at how members of Congress in the region voted over the past week. House votes • World War II Medal: The House passed the Six Triple Eight Congressional Gold Medal Act (S. 321), sponsored by Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kan., to award a Congressional Gold Medal in the honor of the women of […]]]>

Here’s a look at how members of Congress in the region voted over the past week.

House votes

• World War II Medal: The House passed the Six Triple Eight Congressional Gold Medal Act (S. 321), sponsored by Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kan., to award a Congressional Gold Medal in the honor of the women of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion in Europe during World War II. One supporter, Rep. Ed Perlmutter, D-Colo., said, “As the largest contingent of African-American women to serve overseas during World War II, the Six Triple Eights successfully demonstrated that the African-American women could and should be included in the ranks. of the Army “.

The vote, on February 28, was unanimous with 422 yes. FOR: Billy Long, R-MO (7th); Markwayne Mullin, R-OK (2nd); Vicky Hartzler, R-MO (4th); Jake LaTurner, R-KS (2nd).

• Lynchings and Hate Crimes: The House passed the Emmett Till Antilynching Act (HR 55), sponsored by Rep. Bobby L. Rush, D-Ill., to consider acts involving lynching as hate crimes, with associated criminal penalties. One supporter, Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, said, “Lynching is a particularly gruesome act of violence. It was and is as bad as it gets.

The vote on February 28 was 422 yes to 3 no. FOR: Long, R-MO (7th); Mullin, R-OK (2nd); Hartzler, R-MO (4th); LaTurner, R-KS (2nd).

• Hairstyles: The House passed the Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair Act (HR 2116), sponsored by Representative Bonnie Coleman Watson, DN.J., to prohibit discrimination within the federal government based on hair texture or hairstyle. which is related to ethnicity or race. Watson Coleman said, “Far too often black people, especially black women and girls, are ridiculed or deemed unprofessional simply because their hair doesn’t meet white standards of beauty.” One opponent, Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, said the bill was unnecessary because “under current law, if a person’s hairstyle or hair texture is associated with race or national origin of a person and is used as a pretext for discrimination, such conduct is unlawful.

The vote on February 28 was 235 yes to 188 no. CONS: Long, R-MO (7th); Mullin, R-OK (2nd); Hartzler, R-MO (4th); LaTurner, R-KS (2nd).

• Ukraine-Russia War: The House passed a resolution (H. Res. 956), sponsored by Rep. Gregory W. Meeks, DN.Y., calling on Russia to withdraw its troops from Ukraine, supporting sanctions against the Russian government, and urging the United States and its allies to send military aid to Ukraine. Meeks called the resolution “a very strong message, a unified message, to support the people of Ukraine.”

The vote on March 2 was 426 yes to 3 no. FOR: Long, R-MO (7th); Mullin, R-OK (2nd); Hartzler, R-MO (4th); LaTurner, R-KS (2nd).

• Veteran and Toxin Exposures: The House passed the Honoring Our PACT Act (HR 3967), sponsored by Rep. Mark Takano, D-California, to require the Department of Veterans Affairs to take action to increase detection and the treatment of veterans. ‘ potential exposures to toxins during their enlistment. Takano said, “This bill deals with the true cost of war, and opposing it would be a vote against our service members and veterans.” An opponent, Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks, R-Iowa, said the bill lacked scientific criteria for determining whether a veteran’s medical condition stemmed from exposure to toxins, and claimed that would overwhelm the VA with over a million disability claims.

The vote on March 3 was 256 yes to 174 no. CONS: Long, R-MO (7th); Mullin, R-OK (2nd); Hartzler, R-MO (4th); LaTurner, R-KS (2nd).

Senate votes

• COVID-19 Vaccination: The Senate passed a resolution (SJ Res. 32), sponsored by Sen. Roger Marshall, R-Kan., Disapproving and rescinding the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services rule requiring COVID-19 vaccination of health care facility staff doing business with Medicare and Medicaid. Marshall said of the requirement: “Not only is it coercive and unconstitutional, but the mandate fails to take into account that natural immunity is as effective as vaccines and that vaccines do not prevent the transmission of the omicron variant.” One opponent, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said, “Vaccine requirements are nothing new for healthcare workers. Flu vaccination requirements have been common for a long time.

The vote on March 2 was 49 yes to 44 no. FOR: Roy Blunt, R-MO; Jerry Moran, R-KS; Josh Hawley, R-MO; James Lankford, R-OK; Roger Marshall, R-KS. DON’T VOTE: Jim Inhofe, R-OK.

• COVID-19 Emergency: The Senate passed a resolution (SJ Res. 38), sponsored by Sen. Roger Marshall, R-Kan., That would end the national emergency declared by President Donald Trump on March 13, 2020, in response to COVID-19. Marshall said the Biden administration’s efforts to maintain the emergency declaration were “a blatant effort to further expand the massive buildup of power that the federal government has expanded across America over the past two years.” . One opponent of the resolution, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D.N.Y., said it would ‘handicap the Biden administration’s ability to fight the pandemic and increase the danger that all of our progress will suddenly be reversed. in the future”.

The vote on March 3 was 48 yes to 47 no. FOR: Blunt, R-MO; Moran, R-KS; Hawley, R-MO; Lankford, R-OK; Marshall, R-KS. DO NOT VOTE: Inhofe, R-OK.

Source: Targeted Information Service

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House backs bill to help veterans exposed to toxic burning fireplaces https://selagylaw.com/house-backs-bill-to-help-veterans-exposed-to-toxic-burning-fireplaces/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 16:41:15 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/house-backs-bill-to-help-veterans-exposed-to-toxic-burning-fireplaces/ WASHINGTON — A bill that would dramatically increase health care services and disability benefits for veterans exposed to toxic burns in Iraq and Afghanistan was approved in the House Thursday. The measure has the support of major veterans groups across the country and underscores the continued cost of war years after the fighting ended. The […]]]>

The measure has the support of major veterans groups across the country and underscores the continued cost of war years after the fighting ended. The bill’s fate is unclear in the Senate, but if passed, it would increase spending by more than $300 billion over the next decade, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

“If we’re not willing to pay the price of war, we shouldn’t be going,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.

The bill passed by a vote of 256 to 174, with 34 Republicans joining all House Democrats in voting for it.

The bill would also provide new or increased disability benefits to thousands of veterans with cancer or respiratory illnesses such as bronchitis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD. The VA would assume that the veterans developed their disease as a result of exposure to toxic substances while on duty.

Supporters say the bill is a clear acknowledgment by Congress that veterans have been exposed to toxic substances, suffer from them, and that the process of proving to the VA that their illness was caused by their exposure is too cumbersome.

Opponents say the legislation would provide health and disability benefits to many veterans whose conditions may have nothing to do with their military service. They expressed concern that the influx of cases would tax an already stressed VA system, leading to longer wait times for health care and the processing of disability claims.

The political dynamic surrounding the vote was evident in the House on Wednesday as dozens of Democrats, some from competitive districts, spoke in favor of the bill.

“This bill addresses the true cost of war and to oppose it would be a vote against our military and veterans,” said Rep. Mark Takano of California, Democratic chairman of the House Veterans Affairs Committee.

Republicans have generally left it to Representative Mariannette Miller-Meeks of Iowa to oppose the bill. Miller-Meeks, a U.S. Army veteran, said she frequently hears of Iowa veterans waiting months or even years for the benefits they’ve earned, and said the problems would only grow if the bill becomes law. She also noted that the projected cost of the bill is higher than the combined budgets of nine government departments.

“We’re not doing the right thing for our veterans by being fiscally irresponsible on their behalf,” Miller-Meeks said.

The Army routinely used open pits to dispose of tires, batteries, medical waste, and other materials in open pits during operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. A 2020 study from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine found that existing health studies provide insufficient evidence to determine whether exposure to combustion fireplace emissions is linked to adverse respiratory conditions. such as asthma, chronic bronchitis and lung cancer. The study authors said uncertainty does not mean there is no association – only that there is not enough data to draw firm conclusions.

President Joe Biden has raised suspicions that his son’s death from brain cancer was linked to fire pits that were used while Major Beau Biden served in Iraq.

“And they go home, many of the fittest and best-trained warriors in the world, never the same – headaches, numbness, dizziness, cancer that would put them in a flag-draped coffin,” he said. Biden said during Tuesday’s State of the Union address.

Biden said it’s unclear whether a burning hearth caused his son’s brain cancer or the illnesses of so many others who served, “but I’m determined to find out whatever we can.”

One after another, lawmakers supporting the bill cited individual veterans in their districts who had fallen ill or died after repeated exposure to burning fireplaces.

“This is a self-inflicted DOD wound that our military inflicted on our military, and now they are dying as delayed victims of war,” said Rep. Raul Ruiz, D-Calif. “We have to save lives today. It’s a life or death situation.”

The White House approved the House bill, which goes beyond Iraq and Afghanistan. It also adds hypertension to the list of illnesses that Vietnam veterans are believed to have developed due to exposure to the chemical herbicide Agent Orange. The CBO estimates that about 600,000 of the 1.6 million veterans who served in Vietnam and are already receiving disability compensation also have hypertension or high blood pressure. They would be entitled to increased compensation, which would depend on the severity of the illness.

Biden asked the VA last year to examine the impact of hotspots and other airborne hazards. He supported the increase in the number of conditions the VA presumes to be caused by toxic exposure from burn pits.

In November, the White House announced that soldiers exposed to combustion fireplaces who have developed one of three specific illnesses – asthma, rhinitis and sinusitis – within 10 years can receive disability benefits. The House bill builds on that effort with nearly two dozen presumptive conditions, and perhaps more to come in the coming years.

The bill also provides retroactive benefits for veterans whose disability claims have been denied and for survivors of deceased veterans.

The amounts are significant. For example, Vietnam veterans eligible for retroactive payments due to hypertension from Agent Orange exposure would receive retroactive payments of about $13,500, while survivors would receive about $100,000, said the CBO in a December report.

Meanwhile, some 268,000 veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan whose claims were denied would receive retroactive payments averaging about $50,000. And some 5,500 survivors would receive about $160,000 on average, CBO said.

The Senate unanimously passed a much narrower bill extending the length of time veterans receive guaranteed VA care. But House Democrats said the Senate legislation was only a fraction of what was needed.

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Malpractice damages cap protects unsupervised medical assistants https://selagylaw.com/malpractice-damages-cap-protects-unsupervised-medical-assistants/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 06:00:27 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/malpractice-damages-cap-protects-unsupervised-medical-assistants/ California’s $250,000 cap on non-economic damages in medical malpractice suits applies to actions of physician assistants even if they are not properly supervised by a licensed physician, the California Supreme Court has said . In a decision Thursday, the High Court rejected a plaintiff’s argument that the cap on damages passed by the state legislature […]]]>

California’s $250,000 cap on non-economic damages in medical malpractice suits applies to actions of physician assistants even if they are not properly supervised by a licensed physician, the California Supreme Court has said .

In a decision Thursday, the High Court rejected a plaintiff’s argument that the cap on damages passed by the state legislature in 1975 did not apply to her case because medical assistants were not acting within the practice authorized by state law. Professionals who perform procedures outside their scope of practice are exempt from the protections afforded by the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act.

The Supreme Court said the two accused physician assistants are still protected by MICRA because they had valid delegation of services agreements in place, even though the physicians who delegated those services did not in fact perform any supervision .

“Certainly, there are reasonable policy arguments to exclude physician assistants who provide medical services without actual oversight from a cap on non-economic harms, and the legislature is well equipped to weigh and reassess the competing policy considerations,” the report said. ‘opinion. “But our role is limited to interpreting the law before us in a way that best fits the purpose of the legislature in enacting MICRA.”

Marisol Lopez has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Drs. Glenn Ledesma and Bernard Koire and medical assistants Suzanne Freesemann and Brian Hughes after her daughter was diagnosed with skin cancer. Ledesma had signed a service delegation agreement with Feesemann. Koire had signed a DSA with Hughes.

Dr. Glenn Ledesma. (Photo courtesy of California Statewide Assn. of Criminal Investigators)

Lopez took her daughter, Olivia Sarinana, to one of Ledesma’s Los Angeles-area California dermatology clinics in 2010 after she noticed a dark spot on the eight-month-old girls’ scalp. Hughes performed a biopsy and determined that the lesion was “benign”.

Lopez took Olivia back to the clinic in June 2011 after the lesion grew back. Freeseman diagnosed the spot as a “wart” and recommended using liquid nitrogen to remove the growth. Dr. Koire, a plastic surgeon, agreed. A surgeon general removed the legion in December 2011.

In early 2013, Lopez found a growth on her daughter’s neck. Another doctor diagnosed the lump as “metastatic malignant melanoma.” Olivia died in February 2014.

Lopez filed a malpractice lawsuit against the doctors, their medical assistants and others in 2013, before her daughter died. She later amended the action to allege wrongful death.

The Los Angeles County Superior Court found the doctors and their medical assistants liable for their negligence in diagnosing Olivia and awarded $11,200 in damages. The trial court found Lopez’s non-economic damages to be $4.25 million, but reduced the award to $250,000 due to the MICRA cap.

Lopez appealed, arguing that Freeseman and Hughes were not protected by the cap because they were practicing outside the scope of practice permitted by their medical licenses, which require that they be supervised by a physician. The trial court refused to waive the cap even though it concluded in its findings that Ledesma and Koire had in fact not provided any supervision to the dermatology practice.

“They operated on their own and knew it,” Lopez’s attorney said in a petition for review by the appeals court. “None of the allegedly supervising physicians was actively practicing medicine. The two alleged supervising physicians were disabled.

The 2nd District Court of Appeals panel upheld the trial court’s decision in a split decision. On appeal to the Supreme Court, the California Medical Association and other groups representing medical providers filed an amicus brief arguing that the trial court’s decision should be upheld.

“Exempting such a broad group of cases would contravene the legislator’s intent in enacting MICRA: to reduce the liability of health care providers for non-economic damages, thereby reducing medical malpractice insurance costs and improving the ‘access to health care,’ the brief states.

During oral arguments in the Supreme Court, attorney Stuart Esner said physician assistants who treat patients without the supervision of licensed physicians are clearly acting outside the scope of their practice.

“A medical assistant who practices independently is, one, practicing medicine without a license, and two, is guilty of a felony,” Esner said. “Why so? Because the legislature has determined that physician assistants do not have the necessary training or qualifications to safely treat and examine patients in the absence of a physician’s supervision.

Associate Judge Goodwin Liu interrupted Esner to ask if his argument would lead to a “strange result”. Damages caused by physicians would be capped, but there would be no cap for damages caused by physician assistants.

The Supreme Court returned to this theme in its opinion written by Liu.

“Such an exemption would expose physician assistants and, through vicarious liability, their supervising physicians, to unlimited liability for non-economic damages in cases of bodily injury and wrongful death in all areas – an outcome at odds with the central policy underlying the legislative program,” the opinion said.

Steven B. Stevens

Los Angeles malpractice attorney Steven B. Stevens filed an amicus brief on behalf of California consumer attorneys, urging the Supreme Court to find that physician assistants were exempt from the damages cap . Stevens said in an email Friday that “none of the physicians exercised supervision, review, or control over the care and treatment that the assistants provided to patients.”

“Once again, the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act, enacted nearly half a century ago, has failed to protect and compensate patients,” Stevens said. “This case is another example of the urgent need to correct and reform laws that protect negligent health care providers instead of patients.”

Lawyers for Freesemann and Hughes could not be reached for comment.

California voters may have a chance to change the law. A ballot initiative that would raise the cap on non-economic damages to account for inflation since 1975 has qualified for the Nov. 8 ballot, according to the California secretary of state’s office. The initiative would also allow judges and juries to waive the cap entirely for death and permanent disability cases. The state’s legislative analyst estimates the initiative, if passed, would increase state and local government health care costs by “a few tens of millions of dollars to hundreds of millions of dollars.” dollars a year”.

Ledesma and Koire no longer practice medicine. Koire is now deceased, according to California Medical Board records.

The medical board revoked Ledesma’s medical license in 2015 for fraudulently billing insurers for services that were never performed. He also defrauded disability insurers by filing claims stating he was unable to work even while managing several medical clinics scattered around the Los Angeles area, the conclusions of the board State.

California Department of Insurance investigators arrested Ledesma for insurance fraud in March 2015, according to a report by the California Statewide Association of Criminal Investigators. The department said that from 2008 to 2013, Ledesma treated more than 2,900 patients while simultaneously collecting $1,605,464 in disability benefits.

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Using behavioral science and AI to meet the needs of patients and providers https://selagylaw.com/using-behavioral-science-and-ai-to-meet-the-needs-of-patients-and-providers/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 16:12:21 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/using-behavioral-science-and-ai-to-meet-the-needs-of-patients-and-providers/ Leveraging insights from AI and behavioral science can improve financial outcomes as well as clinical outcomes. Why do people make decisions that are not in their best interest? Why do people forgo opportunities that will improve their physical or economic well-being? Thanks to the groundbreaking work of researchers like the Nobel Prize Richard Thalier, we […]]]>

Leveraging insights from AI and behavioral science can improve financial outcomes as well as clinical outcomes.

Why do people make decisions that are not in their best interest? Why do people forgo opportunities that will improve their physical or economic well-being? Thanks to the groundbreaking work of researchers like the Nobel Prize Richard Thalier, we know why people often don’t act rationally. They can be affected by biases such as “availability heuristic”, “bounded rationality” or “loss aversion”. These technical terms simply explain why people make “bad” or suboptimal decisions. behavioral science takes psychology and real-world data into account when analyzing and predicting human behavior.

We believe that in healthcare, leveraging insights from behavioral science along with data and AI can improve financial and clinical outcomes.

Patient Access and Revenue Cycles: Defining the Problem

Problems of patient access to health care are a major problem for health systems. Take, for example, a patient eligible for Medicaid. We know that patients presenting as self-payers can be a significant source of financial pressure on healthcare systems. These patients may experience significant acute services; but if they are uninsured, the likelihood that the health system will be reimbursed for the services provided is very low. Therefore, helping these patients enroll in Medicaid, disability, and other types of federal, state, and local programs is important, for the patient themselves and for the provider.

Denials of medical claims are also on the rise. According to Changing healthcare data, refusals have increased by 23% since 2016, representing more than 11% of all complaints. About half of these denials are due to front-end revenue cycle issues such as authorization/eligibility.

COVID has disrupted the authorization, eligibility and registration process. Between attrition due to burnout and the unintended consequences of vaccination mandates, hospitals are chronically understaffed. Sometimes hospitals cannot ask a specialist to meet with a potential candidate in the emergency department to help determine if they are eligible for Medicaid. Fast forward and you end up with a patient in debt and a hospital not being reimbursed for the care they provided.

The lack of adequate clinical triage also creates problems for the patient and the provider. Providers can sometimes struggle to identify, triage and segment patients to the most efficient care setting. When providers are unable to triage patients appropriately, patients often turn to the emergency room or do not seek care at all.

Another source of friction and inefficiency is “care transitions” – which refers to the movement of patients between healthcare professionals, facilities and home as their condition and care needs change. Ineffective care transition processes lead to adverse events and higher hospital readmission rates and costs.

Enable better decisions

So how can behavioral science help address these and other pernicious issues plaguing our healthcare system? Take, for example, a patient’s ability to weigh all available information and options. Faced with a medical problem, the patient can be shaken by many stresses, including fear, anxiety, financial insecurity. Behavioral science teaches us that this can lead to “cognitive exhaustion.” Simply put, the mind is overwhelmed with too much information and overwhelmed with too much stress to properly process all the signals.

Therefore, communication with the patient can and should be simplified and associated with feelings of empathetic support. Behavioral science tells us that just because a given action will benefit the patient does not necessarily mean that they will act. But by breaking tasks down into simplified “calls to action” and making common cause with the patient (“Let’s finish together”), we can nudge the patient towards the desired outcome.

Behavioral economics can also be used in efforts to enroll patients in medical coverage. The fear of loss – “loss aversion” – is psychologically twice as powerful as the possibility of gain. So, as we engage patients, we can make them more likely to start an enrollment process if it promises to allow them to “not miss a thing”, rather than “make an improvement”.

Small slices: coupling behavioral science to data science

Using behavioral science in patient engagement is inherently a personalized process. One size does not fit all. Data science and AI can help us match the message to the patient and the appropriate platform. This allows us to recognize much more specific slices of the population and moves us away from broad segmentation.

We can identify people most likely to qualify for disability programs or Medicaid. It can also help us understand the right method of communication, and to whom, at each stage of the patient journey.

For example, one might assume that a grandmother in her 60s would prefer phone calls and written communications from her suppliers. However, we know from our data that many seniors are much more digital savvy than you might expect. They have taught themselves how to text and interact on social media so maybe they can keep in touch with their grandchildren. Communicating with them digitally for certain transactions and events may be most appropriate, which traditional broad segmentation would not allow us to recognize.

Data and AI can also predict which patients are most likely not to show up. We know that no-shows hurt efficiency and resource management. So if we know who is most likely to miss an appointment, we can remind them of their appointments more frequently, remove the sticking points that are causing them to miss the appointment, and deploy resources hoping that a certain percentage of people do not show up despite our best efforts.

Transforming the patient and provider experience

Behavioral science coupled with data and AI can inform a nuanced approach, which helps us understand patient motivations and needs and helps inform how best to target patient access strategies. This helps us better understand how to interact more effectively and how to more effectively use an omnichannel communication approach to interact with the entire patient population.

Above all, combining behavioral science, data, and AI leads to better fiscal and clinical outcomes for patients and providers.

Jason Lee, Vice President of Product Management

BA, economics, Harvard University; MBA, Health and Corporate Social Responsibility, Walter A. Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley
Jason Lee oversees offerings throughout the revenue cycle to ensure Change Healthcare’s portfolio of RCM service offerings meet key customer needs. Jason is passionate about developing solutions that help patients navigate effortlessly through their healthcare journey.

Follow Jason on LinkedIn

Tabitha Hillman-Burcham, behavioral science researcher and senior AI manager

BA, International Journalism, Ohio State University; PhD in Behavioral Psychology, Ohio State University
Tabitha Hillman-Burcham is a behavioral specialist at Change Healthcare. She leads a team of behavioral science experts within the AI ​​organization who aim to understand and advocate for the motivations, intentions, feelings, and needs of select populations. She is currently an adjunct professor at Indiana University.

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8 Things People With Healthy Savings Accounts Always Do https://selagylaw.com/8-things-people-with-healthy-savings-accounts-always-do/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 12:01:09 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/8-things-people-with-healthy-savings-accounts-always-do/ Saving Money / Savings Tips PeopleImages/iStock.com If your savings account seems thin or nonexistent, you’re definitely not alone. It has been reported that around 50% of people have less than three months of emergency savings, and a recent GOBankingRates survey found that a staggering 40% of women have less than $100 in their savings accounts. […]]]>

PeopleImages/iStock.com

If your savings account seems thin or nonexistent, you’re definitely not alone. It has been reported that around 50% of people have less than three months of emergency savings, and a recent GOBankingRates survey found that a staggering 40% of women have less than $100 in their savings accounts. saving.

See: 16 effective tips and tricks to help you save money in 2022
Find: where and when to shop to save money on clothes

Although the ability to save money sometimes depends on factors beyond your control, we spoke to several experts who offered a manual explaining how people with healthy savings accounts manage to do so.

Set a monthly budget and stick to it

While budgeting might seem like the obvious answer, that’s because it works, according to David Frederick, director of client success and guidance at First Bank. According to Frederick, an effective budget is your best tracking tool for how much an individual or household is bringing in, how much they’re spending, and how much they can save.

“Expenses are the variable that people can most easily control,” he said.

Check Out: 7 Fastest Ways to Save $20,000, According to Experts

Use advanced savings tools

If the only tool you use to save is a savings account, you risk missing out on earning potential, Frederick warned.

“While it is okay to put money in a savings account, there are often better accounts for long-term savings purposes. People concerned about retirement should save in a 401(k) or IRA. People concerned about health care costs should consider saving in a Health Savings Account (HSA). People saving for a child’s education should consider opening a 529 savings account.”

GOBankingRates’ Top Picks: Best Savings Accounts of 2022

Avoid and mitigate debt

One of the most effective ways to increase savings is to reduce debt, Frederick suggested. Although some debts are difficult to avoid, from mortgages to student loans, he urged people to pay off those debts as quickly and deliberately as possible.

“Also, harmful debts like credit card balances and payday loans should be avoided whenever possible,” Frederick said.

To learn: 19 effective ways to manage your budget

Reduce lifestyle inflation

As we make more money, we tend to spend more money, a concept called “lifestyle inflation,” said Jeff Mains, CEO of Champion Leadership Group LLC, which helps entrepreneurs scale their business. It eats away at all the money we could spend on savings.

So, you should make it your goal to live below your means, says Amanda Howerton, Certified Financial Planner at RKCapital.com.

“People with the healthiest savings accounts are most often the ones who are truly living below their means,” she said. She acknowledged: “It’s so much easier said than done in the age of social media and targeted marketing, so the ‘wish list’ items you casually browse online appear daily. in advertisements.” However, it will be the difference between several thousand dollars over time.

Explore: 10 small changes to stay on track with your savings goals

Automate deposits

According to Brad Biren, Esq, LL.M., a tax law expert known as “RefundDrTax.”

“Calculate what would be a reasonable amount to allocate to savings and automatically transfer that amount into savings. This avoids forgetting and deciding not to.

Set savings deadlines

Additionally, Biren said, “There’s a certain magic that happens when you challenge a person to achieve a goal.” In other words, savings goals are more likely to get you to your amount faster.

“Assuming the goal is achievable, but a little stretched, it will probably become a new habit, as long as the discomfort of the race to save is not too high. For example, stretching or tightening the belt, savers realized they could live happily with less, don’t stop them, keep it up.

He recommends incremental savings goals rather than larger goals for more consistent success and a chance to celebrate accomplishments.

Discover: 50 ways to live the high life on a small budget

Organize short and long term financial goals

It can be more effective to have multiple levels of goals, said Amanda Sullivan, research analyst at CreditDonkey. “People who have a healthy savings account have it for a purpose. Whether it is a mortgage, a car loan or a retirement fund, the money in their banks is used for short or long term financial purposes.

Most likely, they will do this using the bucket savings strategy, where a certain amount of money is set aside in pursuit of a certain goal.

Goals provide a concrete reason to save, said consumer credit expert Tanya Peterson, vice president of branding at Liberty Financial Network, a digital personal finance company. “When you work on things that are important to you, whether it’s saving money, exercising, breaking a bad habit or whatever, you dramatically increase the chances of that happening.”

Options: 16 Effective Ways to Cheat Yourself to Save Money

Look for small ways to save

Smart savers typically look for small ways to save, Petersen laments. “These little ways to work on building a smart spending habit and keeping that focus on your goals. It could be making coffee at home instead of buying expensive lattes or hanging clothes to dry instead of using the dryer. The little things will add up and apply to larger expenses as well.

More from GOBankingRates

About the Author

Jordan Rosenfeld is a freelance writer and author of nine books. She holds a BA from Sonoma State University and an MFA from Bennington College. His articles and essays on finance and other topics have appeared in a wide range of publications and clients including The Atlantic, The Billfold, Good Magazine, GoBanking Rates, Daily Worth, Quartz, Medical Economics, The New York Times , Ozy, Paypal, The Washington Post and for many commercial customers. As someone who had to learn a lot of her money lessons the hard way, she enjoys writing about personal finance to empower and educate people on how to make the most of what they have and how to live. a better quality of life.

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Recently Moved, Promoted, or Appointed to Lincoln | Local business news https://selagylaw.com/recently-moved-promoted-or-appointed-to-lincoln-local-business-news/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/recently-moved-promoted-or-appointed-to-lincoln-local-business-news/ Cline Williams announces new partners Cline Williams Wright Johnson & Oldfather, LLP, is pleased to announce that Lily Amare and Katie A. Joseph were promoted to associate. Lily Amare is a graduate of Chadron State College (BA, 2010) and the University of Nebraska School of Law (JD, 2015). She advises employers on human resources policies […]]]>

Cline Williams announces new partners

Cline Williams Wright Johnson & Oldfather, LLP, is pleased to announce that Lily Amare and Katie A. Joseph were promoted to associate.

Lily Amare is a graduate of Chadron State College (BA, 2010) and the University of Nebraska School of Law (JD, 2015). She advises employers on human resources policies and procedures, best employment practices, reasonable accommodations, harassment and retaliation complaints, and other employment-related matters. Amare writes and edits employment manuals and other employment-related policies and documents. She is an independent investigator for workplace harassment and discrimination complaints. Amare also represents school districts in areas such as employee and student due process and Title IX compliance. She also has a litigation practice and represents employers and schools of all sizes before federal and state courts and administrative agencies.

Katie Joseph is a graduate of the University of Nebraska (BA, 2001) and the University of Nebraska College of Law (JD, 2015). His practice focuses on employee benefits and exempt organizations. As part of Joseph’s employee benefits, she advises private, government, religious and non-profit clients of all sizes on the design and administration of pension and benefits plans and compensation arrangements. delayed. She assists clients starting and terminating plans, and advises clients on fiduciary duties and best practices, reporting and disclosure, correcting plan errors, and responding to Internal Revenue Service and US Department audits. of Labor. Joseph works with all types of exempt organizations, advising clients through all stages of the exempt organization lifecycle, including start-up, obtaining letters of determination, ongoing compliance and governance issues. , reinstatement after dismissal and dissolution.

Founded in 1857, Cline Williams is a full-service law firm with 58 attorneys representing and assisting individual and institutional clients. The company has offices throughout Nebraska in Omaha, Lincoln, and Aurora, as well as in Fort Collins and Holyoke, Colorado.

Commonwealth Electric Announces Management Changes

Commonwealth Electric Company from the midwest is pleased to announce exciting changes in the leadership of our company. T Michel Price was named CEO of the company. Price, a Commonwealth employee for more than 30 years, will succeed David Firestone and assume his responsibilities on January 1, 2022. Former CEO and company founder David Firestone has retired. Price has served as Chairman of the Company since 2019 and as Chief Executive Officer, Price will continue to be the company’s visionary and integrator.

“With big shoes to fill, I know Michael is up for the challenge! Under his leadership, the company will be in very good hands. He is the right man for the job and he and his team will continue to be the new foundation of the CECM!

– David Firestone, former CEO

In addition, Billy Friesen was appointed Secretary General. As Secretary-Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer, Friesen will continue to oversee the Commonwealth’s financial operations and administrative services. Friesen joined the company in 2014 and facilitated the company’s transition to a 100% employee-owned company. Former Commonwealth Secretary General and founder of the original company, Glen Moss, has retired.

Commonwealth Electric Company of the Midwest is a 100% employee-owned, full-service electrical and low-voltage specialty contractor located in Arizona, Iowa and Nebraska.

HoriSun Hospice promotes Nancy Hulewicz to shareholder status

Hospice HoriSun is pleased to announce that Nancy Hulewicz was promoted to shareholder. Hulewicz has 30 years of leadership experience in health care management and had 18 years of experience as a hospice office manager; the last 13 of those with HoriSun Hospice. She has extensive experience in financial operations, coding and billing in various medical organizations including medical offices, hospitals, skilled nursing and home health facilities.

Current shareholders of HoriSun Hospice include Bob Bleicher, MD, and Susan Burkey. Commenting on the promotion of Hulewicz, Dr. Bob Bleicher said, “Nancy is an integral part of the excellent work provided by HoriSun Hospice to patients, their families and referring caregivers. Nancy’s knowledge and guidance has been key to the success of this venture.” Susan Burkey adds, “Nancy’s expertise and leadership will help shape the successful future of HoriSun Hospice.”

HoriSun Hospice was established in 2004 and is privately and locally owned. The mission of HoriSun Hospice, Inc. is to provide the highest level of holistic palliative care with honor and respect for patients and their families. HoriSun Hospice offers help, hope and comfort to people facing life-threatening illness. Our vision is to be the most respected, compassionate, and widely used palliative care provider, serving people from all walks of life. For more information about HoriSun Hospice, please call 402-484-6444 or visit www.horisunhospice.com.

Opening a Home Care Business in Lincoln

A new home care business has opened in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Serving residents of Lancaster and Saunders counties, the Home Care Advocacy Network The franchise is owned and operated by Lincolnite Sarah Pappas.

“We know that most older people want to stay in their homes as they get older, but sometimes they need a little extra help to do that,” Pappas said. “From companionship to personal care and Alzheimer’s/dementia care, our caregivers are carefully selected and trained to provide services that will help our clients age safely in place and give their families peace of mind. much-needed spirit.”

Pappas’ passion for caregiving is rooted in his personal and professional experience. Recently retired from a 27-year career as a corporate meeting planner, Pappas credits her parents and grandparents with teaching her the power of love and the value of duty to others.

“I was very close to my grandfather and started working at our family’s restaurant, the Continental in downtown Lincoln, when I was 10,” she said. “Through his guidance, I learned about caring for others and the importance of providing exceptional service – lessons that I have taken with me throughout my career.”

Over the next 12-18 months, Pappas expects to add 40-50 caregiver jobs and is actively recruiting qualified caregivers.

“Our team looks forward to giving our caregivers the opportunity to embark on a fulfilling career,” said Pappas. “We feel very fortunate to work at a company that allows us to give back to our community while building meaningful relationships with our caregivers, clients and their families.”

Woods Aitken welcomes Shana Knutson

Aitken wood is pleased to announce that Shana L. Knutson joined the firm as a partner. Knutson focuses his practice on telecommunications, with additional areas of interest in business services and real estate law.

Knutson most recently served as general counsel at the Nebraska Public Service Commission, where she focused on telecommunications regulatory issues. While at the Nebraska Public Service Commission, Knutson supported the commission’s efforts in promoting universal service and broadband deployment, including state and federal grant projects. She served as a state member of the Joint Federal-State Council on Universal Service and received the Governor’s Excellence in Leadership Award in 2017.

Knutson received his JD from Cecil C. Humphreys Law School at the University of Memphis and his BA from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Celebrating its 100th anniversary, Woods Aitken focuses its law practice on the long-term success of its clients locally, regionally and nationally. The firm has offices in Denver, Lincoln, Omaha and Washington, DC. The firm’s website is www.woodsaitken.com.

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DOJ Anticompetitive Mergers and Ineffective Regulations https://selagylaw.com/doj-anticompetitive-mergers-and-ineffective-regulations/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 01:10:38 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/doj-anticompetitive-mergers-and-ineffective-regulations/ Antitrust law enforcement promises to end anti-competitive mergers and ineffective regulations. Various federal government leaders have made it clear that they are now applying greater scrutiny to mergers and acquisitions and that they are not thrilled with many years of anti-competitive business deals and regulations that provide inadequate protection for competition. . Statements from the […]]]>

Antitrust law enforcement promises to end anti-competitive mergers and ineffective regulations.

Various federal government leaders have made it clear that they are now applying greater scrutiny to mergers and acquisitions and that they are not thrilled with many years of anti-competitive business deals and regulations that provide inadequate protection for competition. .

Statements from the Justice Department’s Antitrust Division and the Federal Trade Commission’s antitrust authorities have said as much since President Biden took office. Before that, he was not alone in the pack of Democratic candidates who believed the government needed to be tougher to protect competition; it was a key talking point for other candidates, several of whom remain in the Senate today, namely Senators Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

In case anyone in the back of the room couldn’t hear that message, Assistant Attorney General Jonathan Kanter recently delivered it with candor and clarity in a city known at least for its candor. The DOJ Antitrust Enforcement Officer told a meeting of the New York State Bar Association Antitrust Section:

“We have an obligation to enforce antitrust laws as written by Congress, and we will challenge any merger whose effect “may be to lessen competition substantially or tend to create a monopoly.” The second prong – or tends to create a monopoly – has often been given less importance. No more: we intend to stick to the plain language of the Clayton Act.

And if that still wasn’t clear, Kanter repeatedly yelled at Robert Jackson, who in January 1937 began his tenure in the same office Kanter holds today. Jackson – who would go on to serve on the Supreme Court and as a Nazi war crimes prosecutor at Nuremberg – took charge of the “widespread corporate concentration” of the time and “launched[ed] on an aggressive antitrust enforcement campaign to free markets from the grip of monopoly power,” Kanter said. He sees the bold Jackson as his inspiration.

Kanter acknowledged that today’s economy is very different from that of the 1930s, but said it was also different even from that of the 1990s and 2000s. He compared the dramatic changes that led to industries of today with those of the industrial revolution.

This modern development has been accompanied by “serious challenges of competing in too many markets”.

“Over the past two decades,” Kanter said, “concentration has increased in more than 75 percent of U.S. industries, including health care, financial services, agriculture, and others. Price-to-cost markups have tripled over the past 40 years Some labor markets are even more concentrated than product markets Employer monopsony power in labor markets tends to drive down wages, erode quality of life and make harder for workers to change jobs.He said when markets are dominated by giants, entrepreneurs and small businesses struggle to get started, noting that new business training is half of what they were half a century ago.

Kanter said he was “deeply concerned” about the impact of these trends on Americans. “Too little competition hurts real people, every day,” he said. “It’s not just a statistical or economic concept. It’s a half-empty grocery cart for Americans who can’t afford price hikes and padded markups. Or lower wages and poorer working conditions because of employers who face too little competition and workers who don’t have enough options. These are masses of personal and private data mined by mainstream platforms whose digital services have few or no realistic alternatives. And it’s the inability of Americans to buy a home and save for college.

Since antitrust law has not kept pace with our rapidly changing economy, Kanter said “the only way to reinvigorate antitrust enforcement is to adapt our approach…” He said that the Antitrust Division and its enforcement partners “commit to using all available tools to promote competition.”
Kanter discussed the need for an attitude adjustment and more resources:

  • The government’s approach must reflect the times in which we live. “Section 2 [of the Sherman Act] A doctrine that responds to market realities, not outdated models, is a necessary step in building a competitive economy.

  • Pre-merger notifications are coming at an unprecedented rate and more resources are needed. “This surge comes even as market-specific and retrospective studies of mergers indicate that consolidation has led to less competition and more market power. The surge also comes as the division is experiencing a historic shortage of resources.” Kanter is seeking increased funding for the app. “We have an obligation to enforce the antitrust laws as written by Congress, and we will challenge any merger the effect of which ‘may be to lessen competition substantially or tend to create a monopoly’.”

  • Transparency is necessary. “We are also committed to ensuring that we are transparent in our assessment of mergers and that our business models reflect market realities. Accordingly, in conjunction with the FTC, we sought public comment on existing horizontal and vertical merger guidelines. »

“We are law enforcement, not regulators.”

Kantor was particularly critical of the deals reached which he said allowed anti-competitive deals to go forward, saying:

  • Colony efficiency should be reviewed. “Like [Robert] Jackson,” said Kantor, once again invoking the name of his hard-nosed predecessor from the 1930s and 1940s, “I’m focused on how a cure will work. Once the ink has dried and the press cycle has faded, does a settlement actually restore competition? Does it preserve the competitive process? More importantly, does our comprehensive approach to remedies, applied to all cases and all sectors, protect competition as required by law? We are law enforcement, not regulators.

  • Sometimes blocking a transaction is the best solution. “I’m concerned that merger remedies that don’t block a deal are too often successful. Complex implementations, whether behavioral or structural, suffer from significant deficiencies. [W]When the division concludes that a merger is likely to lessen competition, in most situations we should seek a simple injunction to block the transaction. This is the surest way to maintain competition.

  • Settlements are sometimes only a temporary solution. “Merger deals that include partial divestments too often lead to what might be called ‘concentration drift’. This happens when transferred assets end up in the hands of someone who does not put them to effective use. Disposal buyers may lose interest in the assets after acquiring them or be less efficient than they expected.

  • Regulations do not make a useful law. “We need new notices issued by the courts that apply Modern Markets Law to provide clarity for businesses.”

  • All government hands on deck. Kantor welcomed the new cross-departmental initiative — the government-wide antitrust enforcement — launched under President Biden’s Executive Order on Competition. “[T]”The department looks forward to helping other federal departments and agencies win cases targeting anticompetitive behavior that violates industry-specific laws, including through direct litigation support and formalizing our cooperation” via memorandums of understanding,” Kantor concluded.

Edited by Tom Hagy for MoginRubin LLP.

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Left Behind: Medicaid Patients Say Doctor Visits Don’t Always Come https://selagylaw.com/left-behind-medicaid-patients-say-doctor-visits-dont-always-come/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 03:22:25 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/left-behind-medicaid-patients-say-doctor-visits-dont-always-come/ States must implement transportation to medical appointments for people with disabilities enrolled in Medicaid. But patients say those rides come late — and sometimes not at all. (Disability Scoop) Tranisha Rockmore and her daughter Karisma waited at a children’s hospital in Atlanta in July for their ride home. Karisma had been to Atlanta Children’s Health […]]]>

States must implement transportation to medical appointments for people with disabilities enrolled in Medicaid. But patients say those rides come late — and sometimes not at all. (Disability Scoop)

Tranisha Rockmore and her daughter Karisma waited at a children’s hospital in Atlanta in July for their ride home.

Karisma had been to Atlanta Children’s Health Care to get his gastrostomy tube repaired, Rockmore said. The 4-year-old, who has several serious medical conditions, is covered by Medicaid, which provides transportation to and from non-emergency medical appointments through private providers.

After learning a ride wouldn’t be available for hours, Rockmore said, she finally gave up and called her sister to take them home to the town of Ashburn, South Georgia, more than 160 miles away. .

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She said this isn’t the first time she’s had trouble with the Medicaid transportation service.

“Sometimes they never come,” said Rockmore, who doesn’t own a car. Many rides have been canceled recently, she said; the company told her they couldn’t find drivers. “Sometimes they make me feel like they don’t care if my child goes to the doctor or not.”

Rockmore’s remarks would no doubt resonate with Medicaid recipients, loved ones and advocacy groups across the country upset by the problems patients have had getting transportation to medical appointments. Not only are some shuttle drivers failing to show up, but some patients have been injured during rides because their wheelchairs weren’t properly secured, according to lawsuits in Georgia and other states.

States are required to provide transportation to medical appointments for adults, children, and people with disabilities under the Medicaid health insurance program. Transport brokers – such as Modivcare, which Rockmore has used – have subcontracts with local providers, often small “mom and pop” operations, to transport patients to and from needed appointments, including for dialysis, adult day care, mental health and addiction treatment. use disorders.

It’s a lucrative business, with transport management contracts that can be worth tens of millions of dollars to companies. The two companies that have contracts in Georgia have donated extensively to the political campaigns of elected officials in the state. The companies, Modivcare and Southeastrans, have also been the subject of complaints, lawsuits and government fines in Georgia and elsewhere. The two companies, however, argue that the complaints relate to only a tiny percentage of the journeys made.

Non-emergency Medicaid transportation “is absolutely a national challenge,” said Matt Salo, executive director of the National Association of Medicaid Directors. “It’s something that pretty much every state we talk to is dealing with. I don’t think anyone has figured that out.

Beth Holloway, 47, of Wharton, NJ, said she had several issues with the rides. “Sometimes they come late, other times not at all,” said Holloway, who has cerebral palsy and lives independently. “I was stuck in doctor’s offices for hours, sometimes in the elements.”

In Los Angeles, Rose Ratcliff and several other patients filed a lawsuit in 2017 against Modivcare, then known as LogistiCare; other local transport brokers; and insurers that administer the state Medicaid program, known as Medi-Cal in California.

The ongoing lawsuit alleges that Ratcliff and other patients like her missed crucial dialysis appointments and faced unsafe conditions during transport. He calls Modivcare the “broken link” in the Medicaid transportation chain and says the company has failed to respond adequately to complaints from customers like Ratcliff.

Katherine Zerone, spokeswoman for Modivcare, said the company does not comment on ongoing litigation. In an initial legal response, he said the issues were with independent transportation providers and their employees, not Modivcare/LogistiCare.

After complaints were filed about Southeastrans’ service throughout Indiana, the state appointed a special legislative commission to review the company’s performance. Indiana now releases detailed complaint data from the Atlanta-based company monthly.

In August, Timothy Mills, a Bloomington man who uses a wheelchair, filed a lawsuit alleging the company violated the Americans with Disabilities Act and other civil rights laws by not providing a vehicle. wheelchair accessible to transport him to and from his appointments. The lawsuit alleges that due to the lack of wheelchair accommodations, Mills missed out on necessary medical care and was even kicked off the patient lists of some of his local doctors.

“While we are unable to comment on pending litigation, we are aware of the matter and strongly disagree with the allegations,” said Christopher Lee, an attorney for Southeasttrans, which operates in seven states and Washington. , DC.

Two decades ago, Georgia was one of the first states to begin using transportation brokers to manage its Medicaid transportation program. The state’s two longtime providers — Modivcare and Southeastrans — will receive a total of $127.6 million from the state this fiscal year. They receive a monthly fee per member that averages $5.60 in Georgia, regardless of the number of trips, if any, made by a Medicaid user. The state was expected to announce new contracts for Medicaid transportation this month.

Georgia imposed a total of $4.4 million in penalties on the two companies from January 2018 to December 2020 for not picking up patients on time and other issues. However, the state Medicaid agency essentially gave them discounts, billing the two companies just $1.2 million during that time, according to letters from the state Department of Community Health obtained through a request for open files. By extending the brokers’ contracts in fiscal year 2018, the national Medicaid agency agreed to limit damages to 25% of the assessed amount, said Community Health Department spokeswoman Fiona Roberts.

Modivcare said it’s the nation’s largest freight broker, controlling about 40% of the market. The Colorado-based public company provides Medicaid transportation in more than 20 states.

Modivcare and other companies claim that only a tiny fraction of the rides they offer lead to complaints. “Our first priority is safe and reliable transportation,” Zerone said. In Georgia, 99.8% of her trips are complaint-free, she said.

Andrew Tomys, Georgia State Director for Southeast, said 99.9% of trips his company services in the state are “free of valid complaints.”

Modivcare and Southeastrans say they investigate each complaint to determine if it is valid. In Georgia, Modivcare reported to the Department of Community Health more than 3,200 late rides or no-shows in one year out of approximately 2.3 million rides. Residents of the Southeast reported just over 900 such issues on around 1.4 million trips.

But patients and their advocates say that in many cases issues go unreported or complaints are ignored.

Georgia should tie any new contracts to fast rides, ease of use for beneficiaries and the overall ride experience, said Melissa Haberlen DeWolf, director of policy for the advocacy group. Voice for the Children of Georgia.

In recent election cycles, Southeastrans and Modivcare — through its former corporate name LogistiCare — have been generous donors to Republicans in Georgia, who have controlled state offices in the state for nearly two decades.

Southeasttrans, as a company, has donated $126,000 to Republican campaigns and committees in Georgia since 2017, according to documents on the Georgia Government Transparency and Campaign Finance Commission website.

Additionally, Southeasttrans co-founder and CEO Steve Adams has donated at least $86,000 to Georgia’s Republican candidates for state office and the state’s Republican Party since 2017, according to filings by the state. State. During that same period, Adams donated $3,800 to two Democratic candidates in the state.

“As a minority-owned business headquartered in Georgia for more than 20 years, Southeastrans and its owner have contributed to a diverse mix of local causes and organizations,” Lee said.

Modivcare, through LogistiCare, has given $48,350 to Georgia Republican candidates in state races since 2017, according to the Georgia Government Transparency and Campaign Finance Commission. He gave $750 to former Democratic state Rep. Pat Gardner, also according to the commission. Modivcare’s Zerone did not respond to questions about the company’s political donations, saying it would be “competitive information.”

Such contributions can help companies buy access to government officials, said Paul S. Ryan, vice president of government watchdog group Common Cause.

“Anytime a special interest doing business with the government can make large contributions to officials handing out contracts or making other government decisions, that’s cause for concern,” he said. “On average, ordinary Americans can’t buy the same influence.”

Tranisha Rockmore said she was so fed up that she wanted to have a car to avoid transportation issues. “I’m at the point where I feel like they don’t care about my daughter,” she said. “You don’t just make children of people like that.”

KHN (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism on health issues. Along with policy analysis and polls, KHN is one of the three main operating programs of the KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation). KFF is an endowed non-profit organization providing information on health issues to the nation.

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NAB buys health claims payment platform LanternPay https://selagylaw.com/nab-buys-health-claims-payment-platform-lanternpay/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 00:01:43 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/nab-buys-health-claims-payment-platform-lanternpay/ Australian bank NAB has agreed to buy digital health claims payment technology company LanternPay from fintech InLoop. Financial terms were not disclosed. LanternPay operates a digital claims payment platform for the health, disability, insurance and elderly care industries. It was specifically designed to standardize the claims and payment experience for all service providers to public […]]]>

Australian bank NAB has agreed to buy digital health claims payment technology company LanternPay from fintech InLoop. Financial terms were not disclosed.

LanternPay operates a digital claims payment platform for the health, disability, insurance and elderly care industries. It was specifically designed to standardize the claims and payment experience for all service providers to public and private health care plans, including private health insurers, government employees and insurance. accidents, Medicare and the NDIS.

Once the acquisition is complete, LanternPay will be integrated into NAB’s Healthcare Industry Claims and Payments Service (Hicaps), which has been in operation for more than 20 years.

Andrew Irvine, NAB Group Executive, Investment and Private Banking, says: “NAB’s Hicaps integration with LanternPay technology will over time deliver a seamless digital customer experience – with real-time approvals and payments faster for medical, paramedic and other providers.

“Customers who previously might have waited days for a refund from the NDIS, for example, will now receive that payment on the spot. For many Australians, this will be a complete game-changer.”

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Bragar Eagel & Squire, PC remind investors of this class https://selagylaw.com/bragar-eagel-squire-pc-remind-investors-of-this-class/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://selagylaw.com/bragar-eagel-squire-pc-remind-investors-of-this-class/ NEW YORK, Jan. 17, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Bragar Eagel & Squire, PC, a nationally recognized shareholder rights law firm, reminds investors that class action lawsuits have been filed on behalf of shareholders of Meta Materials, Inc. (NASDAQ: MMAT), Talis Biomedical Corporation (NASDAQ: TLIS), FirstCash Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ: FCFS) and Oak Street Health, Inc. (NYSE: […]]]>

NEW YORK, Jan. 17, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Bragar Eagel & Squire, PC, a nationally recognized shareholder rights law firm, reminds investors that class action lawsuits have been filed on behalf of shareholders of Meta Materials, Inc. (NASDAQ: MMAT), Talis Biomedical Corporation (NASDAQ: TLIS), FirstCash Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ: FCFS) and Oak Street Health, Inc. (NYSE: OSH). Shareholders have until the deadlines below to ask the court to serve as lead plaintiff. Additional information on each case can be found at the link provided.

Meta Materials, Inc. (NASDAQ: MMAT)

Course period: September 21, 2020 – December 14, 2021

Lead Applicant Deadline: March 4, 2022

According to the lawsuit, the defendants throughout the Class Period made false and/or misleading statements and/or failed to disclose: (1) the business combination of Torchlight Energy Resources, Inc. and Metamaterial Inc. would result in an SEC investigation and subpoena in the matter titled In the Matter of Torchlight Energy Resources, Inc.; (2) the Company has significantly overestimated its business relationships and connections; (3) the Company has significantly overestimated its ability to produce and market its products; (4) the Company significantly overestimated the novelty and capabilities of its products; (5) the Company’s products did not have the potential to be disruptive because, among other things, the Company priced its products too high; and (6) as a result, the defendants’ public statements were materially false and/or misleading at all relevant times.

On this news, Meta’s stock fell $0.18 per share, or 5.83%, to close at $2.91 per share on Dec. 14, 2021, further hurting investors.

For more information on the Meta Materials class action, please visit: https://bespc.com/cases/MMAT

Talis Biomedical Corporation (NASDAQ: TLIS)

Class Period: February 12, 2021 IPO

Lead Applicant Deadline: March 8, 2022

The complaint filed in this class action alleges that the registration statement was false and misleading and failed to state material adverse facts. Specifically, the defendants failed to disclose to investors: (1) that the comparator test in the primary study lacked sufficient sensitivity to support Talis’ EUA application for the Talis One COVID-19 test; (2) that, as a result, Talis was reasonably likely to experience delays in obtaining regulatory approval for the Talis One COVID-19 test; (3) that, as a result, the Company’s marketing schedule would be significantly delayed; and (4) that as a result of the foregoing, defendants’ positive statements about the company’s business, operations and prospects were materially misleading and/or lacked reasonable basis.

At the start of this action, Talis stock traded as low as $3.81 per share, down more than 76% from the IPO price of $16 per share.

For more information on the Talis class action, please visit: https://bespc.com/cases/TLIS

FirstCash Holdings, Inc.

Course period: February 1, 2018 – November 12, 2021

Lead Applicant Deadline: March 15, 2022

In September 2016, the company, then known as First Cash Financial Services Inc., completed its merger with pawnbroker and payday lender Cash America International, Inc. (“Cash America”). Following the merger, the combined company changed its name to FirstCash Inc. Similarly, following a December 2021 merger with lending company American First Finance, the company changed its name again to FirstCash Holdings, Inc.

The Military Loans Act (“MLA”) provides protections for active duty military personnel and their dependents under the extension of consumer credit. Among other protections, the MLA limits the interest rates that can be charged on consumer loans to active duty members of the armed forces and their covered dependents to a maximum of 36%. In addition, the MLA prohibits lenders from requiring covered parties to submit to arbitration, as well as from imposing other limitations.

In November 2013, Cash America entered into a consent order with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) for making loans to covered service members or their dependents in violation of the MLA, violations related to the recovery of receivables, failure to prevent or detect in a timely manner problematic behavior due to inadequate internal compliance and failure to maintain required records (the “Order”). In the Order, Cash America agreed to cease and desist from violations and to implement a plan designed to ensure its future compliance with the terms of the Order. The CFPB fined Cash America $5 million and ordered it to deposit $8 million into an account to provide relief to affected consumers.

In 2015, the Department of Defense expanded the MLA to cover more credit products, including pawnbrokers. Newly covered creditors, including pawnbrokers, had until October 3, 2016 to bring their operations into compliance with the new rules.

In response to the MLA expansion, which prohibited the company from issuing loans with interest rates above 36%, FirstCash claimed it was “unable to offer any of its current credit products , including pawnbrokers, to members of the United States military or their assigns.” The Company also asserted throughout the Class Period that it used systems, policies and robust procedures to ensure its regulatory compliance and adherence to applicable laws, rules and regulations governing its business, including the MLA.

Despite these assurances, unbeknownst to investors throughout the Class Period, FirstCash engaged in widespread and systemic violations of the MLA and provided thousands of loans to active duty military and their dependents at usurious rates. On November 12, 2021, the CFPB filed a lawsuit alleging that FirstCash and its subsidiary, Cash America West, Inc., violated the MLA by charging more than the allowable annual percentage rate of 36% on more than 3,600 loans on pledge to more than 1,000 assets. -service service members and their dependents. The CFPB also alleged that FirstCash violated the CFPB’s 2013 order prohibiting future violations of the MLA, which remained in effect and applied to FirstCash after the company’s September 2016 merger with First Cash America.

Following these revelations, FirstCash’s stock price fell more than $7 per share, or 8%, in a single day to close at $78.64 per share on November 12, 2021 on trading volume abnormally high. The stock continued to decline in the following days as the market digested the news, losing another $10 per share by November 18, 2021.

For more information on the FirstCash class action, please visit: https://bespc.com/cases/FCFS

Oak Street Health, Inc. (NYSE: OSH)

Course period: August 6, 2020 – November 8, 2021

Lead Applicant Deadline: March 11, 2022

On November 8, 2021, Oak Street disclosed that on November 1, 2021, the company received a Civil Investigation (“CID”) request from the United States Department of Justice (“DOJ”). According to CID, the DOJ was investigating whether the company violated the False Claims Act. CID is also requesting documents and information related to Oak Street’s dealings with “third-party marketers” and Oak Street’s “provision of free transportation to federal health care recipients.”

Following this news, the Company’s share price fell $9.75, or more than 20%, to close at $37.14 per share on November 9, 2021, on unusually high trading volume. raised.

The Complaint filed in this Class Action alleges that throughout the Class Period, the Defendants made materially false and/or misleading statements, and failed to disclose material adverse facts regarding the business, operations and societal prospects. Specifically, the defendants failed to disclose to investors: (1) that Oak Street had relationships with third-party marketers that could provoke law enforcement scrutiny; (2) that Oak Street provided free transportation to federal health care recipients in a manner that would provoke law enforcement scrutiny; (3) that such activities may constitute violations of the False Claims Act; (4) that as such, Oak Street was at heightened risk of investigation by the DOJ and/or other federal law enforcement agencies; (5) that, as a result, Oak Street suffered adverse impacts related to defense and settlement costs and the diversion of management resources; and (6) that as a result of the foregoing, defendants’ positive statements about the company’s business, operations and prospects were materially misleading and/or lacked reasonable basis.

For more information on the Oak Street Health class action, please visit: https://bespc.com/cases/OSH

About Bragar Eagel & Squire, PC:

Bragar Eagel & Squire, PC is a nationally recognized law firm with offices in New York, California and South Carolina. The firm represents individual and institutional investors in commercial, securities, derivatives and other complex litigation before state and federal courts across the country. For more information about the company, please visit www.bespc.com. Lawyer advertisement. Prior results do not guarantee similar results.

Contact details:

Bragar Eagel & Squire, CP
Brandon Walker, Esq.
Alexandra B. Raymond, Esq.
(212) 355-4648
investigations@bespc.com
www.bespc.com

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